""
   
nj home citizen business government services a to z departments
njdep  
Bureau of Air Quality Planning
""
njdep home about dep index by topic programs and units dep online
home page
""

Bureau Programs
& Initiatives

""
emission inventory
""
state implementation plans (sips)
""
mobile source planning
""
Cap & Trade Programs
""
air quality modeling
""
consumer products, portable fuel containers & architectural coatings
""
TBAc Emissions Reporting
""
public participation: reducing air pollution together
""

Planning Information

""
attainment areas status
""
glossary & acrynoms
""
ozone
""
particulate matter
""
regional haze
""

Other NJDEP Programs of Interest

""
Air Quality Education
""
Office of Climate and Energy
""
emission statement program
""
woodburning initiative
""
green commuting
""
environmental regulation
""
bureau of air quality monitoring
""
bureau of air quality permitting
""
air regulation development
""
air toxics
""
bureau of technical services
""
compliance & enforcement
""
science & research
""
clean air council
""
diesel emission reduction program
""
regional greenhouse gas initiative
""
motor vehicle inspections
""

Additional Resources

""
what else you should know
""
what you can do to reduce air pollution
""
usepa office of air & radiation
""
usepa qaqps ttn
""
""

 

Glossary - E
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | Z

EGAS – means Economic Growth Analysis System. The USEPA’s EGAS model is used to project emissions inventories for various pollutants. These growth factors, represent the ratio of a projection year's activity level from a base year activity level.

EGU – means electric generating unit. A combustion or steam generating source used for generating electricity that delivers all or part of its power to the electric power distribution grid for commercial sale.

Eight-Hour Ozone Standards – Since 1971, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has established national air quality standards for ozone. Revised in 1997, the previous national air quality standard for ozone was 0.08 parts per million (ppm), or 80 parts per billion (ppb), averaged over 8 hours. Revised in 2008, the current NAAQS is 0.075 ppm, or 75 ppb, averaged over 8 hours. For a given geographic area to be in compliance, its fourth highest 8-hour concentration in a year, averaged over three years, must be equal to or less than that amount.

Electric generating unit (EGU) – means a combustion or steam generating source used for generating electricity that delivers all or part of its power to the electric power distribution grid for commercial sale.

Emergency – means any situation that arose from sudden and reasonably unforeseeable events beyond the control of an owner or operator of a facility, such as an unforeseen system capacity shortage caused by an act of God, that requires immediate corrective action to prevent system collapse or to restore normal operations at the facility.

Emission – release of pollutants into the air from a source. We say sources emit pollutants. Continuous emission monitoring systems (CEMS) are machines which some large sources are required to install, to make continuous measurements of pollutant release.

Emission Factor – The relationship between the amount of pollution produced and the amount of raw material processed. For example, an emission factor for a blast furnace making iron would be the number of pounds of particulates per ton of raw materials.

Emission Statement – means a report of the actual annual emissions of a facility submitted by the owner or operator to the Department pursuant to the requirements of N.J.A.C. 7:27-21.

Enforcement – The legal methods used to make polluters comply with air quality regulations. Enforcement methods include citations of polluters for violations of the law (citations are much like traffic tickets), fines, and even jail terms. The USEPA and the state and local governments are responsible for enforcement of the Federal Clean Air Act, but if they don't enforce the law, members of the public can sue the USEPA or the states to get action. Citizens can also sue violating sources, apart from any action the USEPA or state or local governments have taken. Before the 1990 Clean Air Act, all enforcement actions had to be handled through the courts. The 1990 Clean Air Act gave the USEPA authority so that, in some cases, the USEPA can fine violators without going to court first. The purpose of this new authority is to speed up violating sources' compliance with the law and reduce court time and cost.

Equipment – means any device capable of causing the emission of an air contaminant either directly or indirectly to the outdoor atmosphere, and any stack or chimney, conduit, flue, duct, vent or similar device connected or attached to, or serving the equipment. This term includes, but is not limited to, a device in which the preponderance of the air contaminants emitted is caused by a manufacturing process.

EPA (or USEPA) – means the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

""

 

""

contact dep privacy notice legal statement accessibility statement nj home ""
""