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Yellow Perch

General Facts
Yellow perch are one of the premier species targeted each winter by ice fishermen. Known for their excellent fight on light tackle and flavorful taste, yellow perch are a fish for all seasons. Anglers that prefer to fish the open waters after the ice melts will find immediate action. The weeks following ice out can be even better than ice fishing.

Where
Lakes that are sure to produce some excellent yellow perch action include Greenwood Lake, Lake Hopatcong, Cranberry Lake, Swartswood Lake, Lake Lenape and Malaga Lake. Perch are also found in the Maurice River and the Great Egg Harbor River. Yellow perch can be found in rivers moving upstream in the early spring. Areas below spillways can produce good size perch. Lake anglers will find yellow perch around edges of aquatic vegetation and near stumps.

When
Yellow perch are active all year long, however the cooler months of September through May are probably the best.

How
Typically anglers use live bait, including small minnows and worms. Small hair jigs, plastic tubes and twister tails also work well. Lures typically used for crappie fishing are equally effective on yellow perch. Small spinners and minnow imitators are great when yellow perch are actively feeding.

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Department of Environmental Protection
P. O. Box 402
Trenton, NJ 08625-0402

Last Updated: August 18, 2004