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2004 Annual
Confer
ence

 

Schedule

Conference Flyer
(PDF Format)

Conference Brochure
(PDF Format)

Spring 2004 Historic Preservation Bulletin: Archaeology Theme Issue
(PDF Format)


Awareness of the past enriches the present by bringing a more complete understanding of human experience to contemporary life. This appreciation has inspired individual citizens and community groups to advocate for resource identification, protection, and interpretation. While all resource types can enrich our understanding, the focus of the 2004 conference was on New Jersey's archaeological resources.

Morning speakers were Dr. William Kelso and Dr. R. Michael Stewart. Using his work with the Jamestown Rediscovery Project, Dr. Kelso challenged our commonly held perceptions about our buried past, while illustrating how "rediscovery" leads to reinterpretations of history and invigorates heritage tourism. Dr. Kelso's presentation instilled a sense of the challenge and mystery solving associated with the effort to dispel the long held belief that the remains of the earliest settlement of Jamestown were all gone, eroded into the James River. Dr. Kelso challenged common misconceptions about site location and preservation, and showed how careful, well designed archaeological investigation can yield highly significant, unforeseen discoveries as well as solid scientific data for testing hypotheses. The work at Jamestown exemplifies the role that archaeological resources can and should play in defining community identify, fostering pride, and bolstering local heritage tourism.

Dr. Stewart, one of the leading experts on the Native American archaeology of the Delaware Valley, provided a glimpse into the lives of New Jersey's original inhabitants through an archaeological portal. He discussed the ways in which the material remains left behind by the original New Jerseyans can inform regarding lifeways. He chronicled aspects of our most up-to-date anthropological understanding of 11,000 years of prehistory in New Jersey.

There were three breakout tracks in the afternoon. "Archaeology: Bringing Historic Sites to Life," focused on the ways archaeology enables communities and historic site managers to better interpret historic properties, bringing new life to sites and their former occupants. The process of archaeological exploration can stimulate, educate, and involve community members in the history under their feet. Gail Hunton and Rebecca Yamin discussed their collaborative efforts on several projects to benefit Monmouth County's historic sites and public. Richard Veit discussed his work with students and volunteers at house museums. James Lee used his expertise with New Jersey's canals to illustrate how interpreted ruins and restored features convey feelings and understanding of our forebears' labors. David Orr discussed working with volunteers from initial discovery through historic reenactments at Valley Forge and Independence National Historic Park.

A second breakout track focused on archaeological site protection. Aspects of federal and state laws, regulation, standards, and guidelines were reviewed and exemplified by Nancy Brighton, Elizabeth Merritt, and Andrea Tingey. The quality of most archaeological work in New Jersey is enhanced when the regulators, the regulated community, and historic preservation professionals doing the work all comprehend the laws and regulations. Archaeological site identification and protection at the municipal level in New Jersey was discussed by F. Robert Perry, Olga Chesler, and Larry Randolph. Their experiences in Evesham and South Plainfield townships have broad applicability throughout our state's municipal milieu.

The third breakout track, "From Your House to the White House: Tips for Effective Advocacy," explored some of the complexities of successful advocacy. Just because a sites has been temporarily rescued does not mean it has been preserved. This two session track explored the basic tools, techniques, programs, an incentives for saving resources and ensuring long-term protection. The basics of advocacy were covered within the context of the three-year long saga to nominate the Black Creek Native American archaeological site in Sussex County to the New Jersey and National Register of Historic Places. Panelists and speakers included Adrian Scott Fine, Urie Ridgeway, Jessica Paladini, and Gregory Werkheiser. Synergistic relationships between open space preservation/acquisition and historic and archaeological site protection were explored in presentations by Fawn McGee, Bill Liebeknecht, Greg Lattanzi, and Ron Emrich.

Many of the topics explored at the conference were introduced prior to the conference in the Spring 2004 Historic Preservation Bulletin.

Sponsored by: NJ DEP, Natural and Historic Resources, Historic Preservation Office
Co-Sponsored by:
Preservation New Jersey, NJ Department of Transportation, Old Barracks Museum, and Archaeological Society of New Jersey

 

 
Conference Schedule
Masonic Temple (A)
8:00 - 9:00

Registration & Coffee

 
9:00 - 9:30
Welcome & Introduction
9:30 - 10:30
Keynote Speaker: Dr. William Kelso, Jamestown Rediscovery Project
Archaeology provides Dr. Kelso with a sense of challenge and mystery-solving. In 1996, Kelso and a small staff of archaeologists dispelled the long held belief that the remains of the earliest settlement at Jamestown had eroded into the James River. Not only will Kelso challenge common misconceptions about probable site locations, but drawing from his work on the Rediscovery Project, conference participants will gain an understanding of how sensitive investigation can change and reinterpret our past. Kelso’s work in Jamestown exemplifies the role that archaeological resources can and should play in defining community identity, fostering pride, and bolstering the local tourism economy.
10:45 - 11:00
Break
11:00 -12:00

Featured Speaker: Dr. R. Michael Stewart,
Temple University, Department of Anthropology
Did you ever wonder what life was like in New Jersey before European settlement? Dr. R. Michael Stewart, one of the leading experts on the prehistoric archaeology of the Delaware Valley, will provide a glimpse into the lives of New Jersey’s Native Americans as understood through the lens of archaeology. His presentation will discuss the ways in which the material remains left behind by these original Americans tell us about their lifeways. Dr. Stewart will also chronicle aspects of our understanding of Native American cultural change during the past 11,000 years.

State House Annex (B)
12:15 - 1:45

Boxed Lunch

Preservation New Jersey Resource Room

Book Signing

1:30 - 3:15

Concurrent Sessions I
Track 1
Archaeology: Bringing Historic Sites to Life
Archaeology enables communities and historic site managers to better interpret historic properties, bringing new life to the sites and their former occupants. The contribution of archaeology extends far beyond its value to history and historical interpretation. The process of archaeological exploration can stimulate, educate, and involve community members in the history under their feet.

Public Archaeology on the Public's Sites
Site Manager, Gail Hunton, and archaeologist, Rebecca Yamin, have collaborated on several projects to the benefit of Monmouth County's historic sites and its public. They will discuss long term planning to accomplish archaeology. Professor Richard Veit has built a reputation working with students and volunteers at house museums and other sites. Through effective planning the usefulness of the archaeology on public sites has been far greater than often modest project scopes would suggest. The session will explore initial considerations such as project funding and promotion through enhanced outcomes such as broadened interpretive programs. You will learn how to provide "voices" to speakers of the past, and the critical integration between archaeology, site planning and management. Moderator: Gail Hunton, Monmouth County Parks Commission Speakers: Gail Hunton, Monmouth County Parks Commission; Rebecca Yamin Ph.D. John Milner Associates; Richard Veit, Monmouth University, Department of History & Anthropology

Track 2
Archaeological Site Protection
Respect for the past and archaeological remains of the past have been embraced by the federal, state, county, and local governments. This track introduces the laws, regulations, standards, and guidelines that shape public archaeology in New Jersey.
Federal and State Laws, Regulations, Standards and Guidelines
The session will begin with a brief introduction to the intellectual basis for Government's involvement in the protection of historic properties. Most archaeological work in New Jersey is required by consequent federal and state laws and regulations. The quality of this archaeological work is enhanced when the regulators, the regulated community, and historic preservation professionals doing the work know the requirements of the laws and regulations. Speakers will outline pertinent regulations including: Section 106, Section 4(f), the New Jersey Register of Historic Places Act, Department of Environmental Protection Land Use permits, Pinelands Commission, and NJ Executive Order 215. Moderator: Nancy Brighton, US Army Corps of Engineers - New York District Speakers: Elizabeth Merritt Esq., National Trust for Historic Preservation; Andrea Tingey, Historic Preservation Office
Track 3
From Your House to the White House: Tips for Effective Advocacy
All too often, historic and archaeological resources are the center of public controversy. This track has been developed to familiarize conference participants with the complexities of successful advocacy . Just because a site has been temporarily rescued, does not necessarily mean it's preserved. This two-session track will explore the basic tools, techniques, programs and incentives for saving resources and ensuring long-term protection. Connecting local grassroots advocacy to state and national lobbying efforts will also be featured.

Basics of Advocacy: Local, Legal & Tribal
All too often, historic and archaeological resources are the center of controversy. This session will begin with an overview of the basic tools and strategies that can be used and adapted to advocate for the immediate protection and long term preservation of cultural resources. This introduction will be followed by a moderated panel session which will provide a critical analysis on the three-year saga to nominate the Black Creek Site to the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places. Local advocacy, legal tactics and strategic influence from the Native American community subtly changed the dynamics of the historic preservation playing field in New Jersey. Our panelists will share their perspectives on the importance of preserving this site, and their collaborative effort to ensure its preservation. Moderator: Dorothy P. Guzzo, HPO Speakers: Adrian Scott Fine, National Trust for Historic Preservation; Urie Ridgeway, Tribal Councilman, Naticoke-Lenni-Lenape; Jessica Paladini, Vernon Township Civic Association; Gregory Werkheiser Esq., Piper Rudnick, pro bono counsel for Lenni-Lenape

1:30 - 5:00

Tours
Tours will embark (rain or shine) in front of the State House Annex. Please note that each tour is limited to a maximum of 30 participants.

Abbot Farm Tour, Led by Dr. R. Michael Stewart
Dr. R. Michael Stewart, of Temple University, will be providing a three-hour walking tour of Abbott Farm National Historic Landmark. Abbott Farm is composed of multiple sites with occupations spanning from the Paleo-Indian through Contact periods. This property became the focal point of a famous 40-year controversy about the antiquity of human occupation of the New World. More than 100 books and articles have been published on Abbott Farm and the Landmark continues to provide insight into Native American lifeways by being a focus of ongoing archaeological research. The tour will give participants a sense of the types of landscapes that attracted Native American settlement and the ways in which these settings have changed over time. The tour will be open to all registered attendees, but will be limited to 30 participants on a first-come, first-served basis. The tour will involve brisk walking through wooded areas and some rough terrain, and therefore, require proper outerwear and foot attire. Insect repellent is also recommended.

Trenton Walking Tour, Led by Richard Hunter & Ian Burrow
Take part in a two part guided tour of the historic urban landscapes of Trenton led by Richard Hunter and Ian Burrow, Principals of Hunter Research, Inc. of Trenton, who have devoted much time to research on this fascinating city.

Part One: Parks for the Living and Parks for the Dead with Richard Hunter. A bus will take us to two important Trenton landmarks: Riverview Cemetery and the brand-new NJ Route 29 Historic Deck Park. Riverview Cemetery has its origins in a Quaker cemetery laid on the bluff above the Delaware in the late 1670's. Long before that, it was a prime settlement location for Native Americans. In the 19th century it was landscaped and greatly expanded and now contains the memorials of many prominent Trentonians and of George McClellan, Civil War general and Governor of New Jersey. The exciting and innovative historical interpretive program at the adjacent Route 29 Deck Park takes visitors through the history of Trenton using a variety of media.

Part Two: Trenton Underground with Ian Burrow. This walking tour (wear appropriate shoes and clothing: this is a rain or shine event!) will explore the urban historic landscape and archaeological sites of 18th century Trenton in the State House and Mill Hill Historic Districts. Prehistoric settlements, underground streams, early iron and steel works, military and governmental sites, waterpower systems and mills all lie in this small area. Clues to these features are lurking in the modern urban fabric.

3:15 - 3:30
Break
3:30 - 5:00
Concurrent Sessions II
Track 1
Creating Community Out of Fragments of the Past
Can ruinous and forgotten sites pull communities together to tell lost stories and restore a sense of place? James Lee looks at New Jersey's canals, in order to illustrate considerations in treatment of historic features on the landscape from interpreted ruins to restoration. Professor David Orr, perhaps more recognized for his work in locations such as Valley Forge and Independence National Historic Park, will discuss working with volunteers from initial discovery through historical reenactments. Moderator: Richard Hunter, Ph.D., Hunter Research, Inc. Speakers: James Lee, Hunter Research, Inc.; David Orr Ph.D., Temple University, Dept. of Anthropology
Track 2
Archaeological Site Identification and Protection at the Municipal Level
Powerful tools are available to municipalities for identifying, evaluating, and protecting their archaeological resources. Three panelists in this session will share their experiences in crafting master plans and ordinance language that integrates archaeological considerations with other valued elements of community life. Moderator: Mike Gregg, HPO Speakers: F. Robert Perry P.P., Evesham Township Planner; Olga A. Chesler, Esq., Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads LLP, and member of the Cherry Hill Historical Commission; Larry Randolph, Chair, South Plainfield Township Environmental Commission
Track 3
Making It Work
This session will explore some strategies for effective historic and archaeological site advocacy. Presentations will provide critical information for lobbying at the state and federal levels, discuss state-level organizations that may provide support for lobbying efforts, and highlight the synergistic relationship between open space preservation/acquisition and historic and archaeological site protection. Moderator: Katherine Marcopul, HPO Speakers: Fawn McGee, NJDEP, Green Acres; William Liebknecht, President and Gregory Lattanzi, 2nd Vice President, ASNJ; Ron Emrich, Preservation New Jersey
Old Barracks (C)
5:00 - 7:00
Closing Reception

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