New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards
May 1996

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Science Standards And Progress Indicators
Standard 5.2:
All Students Will Develop Problem-Solving, Decision-Making And Inquiry Skills, Reflected By Formulating Usable Questions And Hypotheses, Planning Experiments, Conducting Systematic Observations, Interpreting And Analyzing Data, Drawing Conclusions, And Communicating Results

Descriptive Statement: Students best learn science by doing science. Science is not merely a collection of facts and theories but a process, a way of thinking about and investigating the world in which we live. This standard addresses those skills that are used by scientists as they discover and explain the physical universe - skills that are an essential and ongoing part of learning science.

Cumulative Progress Indicators

By the end of Grade 4, students:

1.

State a problem about the natural world in the form of a question.

2.

Develop strategies and skills for information-gathering and problem-solving, using appropriate tools and technologies.

3.

Use technology to present the design and results of investigation.

4.

Keep a journal record of observations, recognizing patterns of observations and summarizing findings.

5.

Learn what constitutes evidence and evaluate the data and information used to make explanations.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 8, students:

6.

Identify problems that can be solved by conducting experiments.

7.

Design and conduct experiments incorporating the use of a control.

8.

Collect and organize data to support the results of an experiment.

9.

Communicate experimental findings using words, charts, graphs, pictures, and diagrams.

10.

Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of claims, arguments, and data.

11.

Assess the risks and benefits associated with alternative actions.

Building upon knowledge and skills gained in the preceding grades, by the end of Grade 12, students:

12.

Select and use appropriate instrumentation to design and conduct investigations.

13.

Use technology to present the design and results of investigation.

14.

Evaluate conclusions, weigh evidence, and recognize that arguments may not have equal merit.

15.

Explain how experimental results lead to further investigation.

 

 

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