Core Curriculum Content Standards

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Visual and Performing Arts Learning Progressions

1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies All students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies, judgment, and analysis to works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
A. Aesthetic Responses
NOTE: By the end of preschool, all students attain foundational skills that progress toward BASIC LITERACY in CREATIVE MOVEMENT AND DANCE, MUSIC, DRAMATIC PLAY AND STORYTELLING, and VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 2, all students progress toward BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, and VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 5, all students demonstrate BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, and VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 8, all students demonstrate COMPETENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, or VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 12, all students demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, or VISUAL ART.
Content: Each arts discipline offers distinct opportunities to observe, experience, interpret, appreciate, and respond to works of art and beauty in the everyday world.

1.4.P.A.1Describe feelings and reactions in response to a creative movement/dance performance.
Content: Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists who create them.

1.4.2.A.1Identify aesthetic qualities of exemplary works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art, and identify characteristics of the artists who created them (e.g., gender, age, absence or presence of training, style, etc.).
Content: Works of art may be organized according to their functions and artistic purposes (e.g., genres, mediums, messages, themes).

1.4.5.A.1Employ basic, discipline-specific arts terminology to categorize works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art according to established classifications.
Content: Contextual clues to artistic intent are embedded in artworks. Analysis of archetypal or consummate works of art requires knowledge and understanding of culturally specific art within historical contexts.

1.4.8.A.1Generate observational and emotional responses to diverse culturally and historically specific works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art
Content: Recognition of fundamental elements within various arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) is dependent on the ability to decipher cultural implications embedded in artworks.

1.4.12.A.1Use contextual clues to differentiate between unique and common properties and to discern the cultural implications of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
Content: Each arts discipline offers distinct opportunities to observe, experience, interpret, appreciate, and respond to works of art and beauty in the everyday world.

1.4.P.A.2Describe feelings and reactions in response to diverse musical genres and styles.
Content: Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists who create them.

1.4.2.A.2Compare and contrast culturally and historically diverse works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art that evoke emotion and that communicate cultural meaning.
Content: Formalism in dance, music, theatre, and visual art varies according to personal, cultural, and historical contexts.

1.4.5.A.2Make informed aesthetic responses to artworks based on structural arrangement and personal, cultural, and historical points of view.
Content: Art may be used for utilitarian and non-utilitarian purposes.

1.4.8.A.2Identify works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art that are used for utilitarian and non-utilitarian purposes.
Content: Contextual clues within artworks often reveal artistic intent, enabling the viewer to hypothesize the artist’s concept.

1.4.12.A.2Speculate on the artist’s intent, using discipline-specific arts terminology and citing embedded clues to substantiate the hypothesis.
Content: Each arts discipline offers distinct opportunities to observe, experience, interpret, appreciate, and respond to works of art and beauty in the everyday world.

1.4.P.A.3Describe feelings and reactions and respond in an increasingly informed manner to stories and dramatic performances.
Content: Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists who create them.

1.4.2.A.3Use imagination to create a story based on an arts experience that communicated an emotion or feeling, and tell the story through each of the four arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art).
Content: Criteria for determining the aesthetic merits of artwork vary according to context. Understanding the relationship between compositional design and genre provides the foundation for making value judgments about the arts.

1.4.5.A.3Demonstrate how art communicates ideas about personal and social values and is inspired by an individual’s imagination and frame of reference (e.g., personal, social, political, historical context).
Content: Performance technique in dance, music, theatre, and visual art varies according to historical era and genre.

1.4.8.A.3Distinguish among artistic styles, trends, and movements in dance, music, theatre, and visual art within diverse cultures and historical eras.
Content: Artistic styles, trends, movements, and historical responses to various genres of art evolve over time.

1.4.12.A.3Develop informed personal responses to an assortment of artworks across the four arts disciplines (dance, music, theatre, and visual art), using historical significance, craftsmanship, cultural context, and originality as criteria for assigning value to the works.
Content: Each arts discipline offers distinct opportunities to observe, experience, interpret, appreciate, and respond to works of art and beauty in the everyday world.

1.4.P.A.4Describe feelings and reactions and make increasingly thoughtful observations in response to a variety of culturally diverse works of art and objects in the everyday world.
Content: Each arts discipline (dance, music, theatre, and visual art) has distinct characteristics, as do the artists who create them.

1.4.2.A.4Distinguish patterns in nature found in works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
  Content: Abstract ideas may be expressed in works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art using a genre’s stylistic traits.

1.4.8.A.4Compare and contrast changes in the accepted meanings of known artworks over time, given shifts in societal norms, beliefs, or values.
Content: Criteria for assessing the historical significance, craftsmanship, cultural context, and originality of art are often expressed in qualitative, discipline-specific arts terminology.

1.4.12.A.4Evaluate how exposure to various cultures influences individual, emotional, intellectual, and kinesthetic responses to artwork.
Content: Active listening with focus, intent, and understanding is an important component of full appreciation of the performing arts and the foundation for language development.

1.4.P.A.5Begin to demonstrate appropriate audience skills during creative movement and dance performances.
    Content: Symbolism and metaphor are characteristics of art and art-making.

1.4.8.A.5Interpret symbolism and metaphors embedded in works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
 
Content: Active listening with focus, intent, and understanding is an important component of full appreciation of the performing arts and the foundation for language development.

1.4.P.A.6Begin to demonstrate appropriate audience skills during recordings and music performances.
    Content: Awareness of basic elements of style and design in dance, music, theatre, and visual art inform the creation of criteria for judging originality.

1.4.8.A.6Differentiate between “traditional” works of art and those that do not use conventional elements of style to express new ideas.
 
Content: Active listening with focus, intent, and understanding is an important component of full appreciation of the performing arts and the foundation for language development.

1.4.P.A.7Begin to demonstrate appropriate audience skills during storytelling and performances.
    Content: Artwork may be both utilitarian and non-utilitarian. Relative merits of works of art can be assessed through analysis of form, function, craftsmanship, and originality.

1.4.8.A.7Analyze the form, function, craftsmanship, and originality of representative works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
 
1.4 Aesthetic Responses & Critique Methodologies All students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of arts philosophies, judgment, and analysis to works of art in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
B. Critique Methodologies
NOTE: By the end of grade 2, all students progress toward BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, and VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 5, all students demonstrate BASIC LITERACY in the following content knowledge and skills in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, and VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 8, all students demonstrate COMPETENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, or VISUAL ART. NOTE: By the end of grade 12, all students demonstrate PROFICIENCY in the following content knowledge and skills for their required area of specialization in DANCE, MUSIC, THEATRE, or VISUAL ART.
Content: Relative merits of works of art can be qualitatively and quantitatively assessed using observable criteria.

1.4.2.B.1Observe the basic arts elements in performances and exhibitions and use them to formulate objective assessments of artworks in dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
Content: Identifying criteria for evaluating performances results in deeper understanding of art and art-making.

1.4.5.B.1Assess the application of the elements of art and principles of design in dance, music, theatre, and visual artworks using observable, objective criteria.
Content: Assessing a work of art without critiquing the artist requires objectivity and an understanding of the work’s content and form.

1.4.8.B.1Evaluate the effectiveness of a work of art by differentiating between the artist’s technical proficiency and the work’s content or form.
Content: Archetypal subject matter exists in all cultures and is embodied in the formal and informal aspects of art.

1.4.12.B.1Formulate criteria for arts evaluation using the principles of positive critique and observation of the elements of art and principles of design, and use the criteria to evaluate works of dance, music, theatre, visual, and multimedia artwork from diverse cultural contexts and historical eras.
Content: Constructive criticism is an important evaluative tool that enables artists to communicate more effectively.

1.4.2.B.2Apply the principles of positive critique in giving and receiving responses to performances.
Content: Decoding simple contextual clues requires evaluation mechanisms, such as rubrics, to sort fact from opinion.

1.4.5.B.2Use evaluative tools, such as rubrics, for self-assessment and to appraise the objectivity of critiques by peers.
Content: Visual fluency is the ability to differentiate formal and informal structures and objectively apply observable criteria to the assessment of artworks, without consideration of the artist.

1.4.8.B.2Differentiate among basic formal structures and technical proficiency of artists in works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
Content: The cohesiveness of a work of art and its ability to communicate a theme or narrative can be directly affected by the artist’s technical proficiency as well as by the manner and physical context in which it is performed or shown.

1.4.12.B.2Evaluate how an artist’s technical proficiency may affect the creation or presentation of a work of art, as well as how the context in which a work is performed or shown may impact perceptions of its significance/meaning.
Content: Contextual clues are embedded in works of art and provide insight into artistic intent.

1.4.2.B.3Recognize the making subject or theme in works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
Content: While there is shared vocabulary among the four arts disciplines of dance, music, theatre, and visual art, each also has its own discipline-specific arts terminology.

1.4.5.B.3Use discipline-specific arts terminology to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.
Content: Universal elements of art and principles of design apply equally to artwork across cultures and historical eras.

1.4.8.B.3Compare and contrast examples of archetypal subject matter in works of art from diverse cultural contexts and historical eras by writing critical essays.
Content: Art and art-making reflect and affect the role of technology in a global society.

1.4.12.B.3Determine the role of art and art-making in a global society by analyzing the influence of technology on the visual, performing, and multimedia arts for consumers, creators, and performers around the world.
  Content: Levels of proficiency can be assessed through analyses of how artists apply the elements of art and principles of design.

1.4.5.B.4Define technical proficiency, using the elements of the arts and principles of design.
   
  Content: Artists and audiences can and do disagree about the relative merits of artwork. When assessing works of dance, music, theatre and visual art, it is important to consider the context for the creation and performance of the work (e.g., Who was the creator? What purpose does the artwork serve? Who is the intended audience?).

1.4.5.B.5Distinguish ways in which individuals may disagree about the relative merits and effectiveness of artistic choices in the creation and performance of works of dance, music, theatre, and visual art.