NJDOE News

Contact: Richard Vespucci
For Release: May 25, 2001

NJHire Marks First Anniversary at Start of Job-Seeking Season

NJHire, the state’s electronic hiring hall for educators, marked its first anniversary this month as the prime job-seeking season begins for the 2001-02 school year. The site has proven to be a magnet for job seekers in education as well as for school boards seeking to fill vacancies.

"In a very short time, NJHire has established itself as a valuable sevice in our efforts to recruit and retain a pool of talented educators," said acting Gov. Donald T. DiFrancesco. "By all accounts, it has surpassed all of our expectations and has had a tremendous impact."

"NJHire has been an enormous success for school districts as well as for potential teachers," said Commissioner of Education Vito A. Gagliardi, Sr. "It is a free, 24-hour service that has allowed us literally to span the globe for talented educators who may consider moving to our state.

"New Jersey has great schools and many creative and inquisitive students," Dr. Gagliardi continued. "I invite teachers and administrators to visit NJHire and make their next career move in the Garden State."

In just 365 days, more than 4.3 million "hits" have been recorded at NJHire. Nearly 13,200 teachers and approximately 700 school districts / recruiters have registered for the free service. More than 7,600 applications have been submitted for the more than 1,600 positions advertised. In addition, nearly 3,500 resumes have been posted by users of the service.

School districts throughout the state are reporting their satisfaction with NJHire as a source to use in fulfilling their personnel needs.

Dr. Thomas Grites, a vice president at Richard Stockton State College and a member of the Absecon Board of Education, reported that Absecon was able to hire an English as a second language (ESL) teacher through NJHire. The teacher, originally from New York City, was getting married and relocating to Atlantic County.

Dr. Ralph Ferrie, superintendent of Absecon City Schools, said he posted seven positions in the early weeks of NJHire and received approximately 60 applications. He said the service is an excellent way to post positions at no cost, saving expenses while gaining access to a broad range of applicants.

Paterson’s first experience with NJHire was to promote a district-wide job fair in March. "We received an overwhelming response from candidates all over the state who were interested in attending," said Sheila A. Ruth of the district’s Office of Human Resources/Personnel.

"We have continued to use the site by posting all of our current vacancies for the upcoming school year," she said. "We continue to receive applications daily from interested candidates and we are forwarding their credentials to our schools for interviews."

Through NJHire, school districts post vacancies and review online resumes posted by prospective teachers and college graduates. Colleges and universities have introduced their students to the site and have trained them in its use.

NJHire was developed in cooperation with the National Center for Education Careers. In 1999, the center made available to states a national database of prospective teachers, USTEACH.

NJHire uses the most advanced education and networking technology to provide information and recruitment services for the education community. Its features include no cost to users, ease of use, high level of security, automatic accuracy check and maps to school districts, among others.

School districts and job applicants for teaching positions are encouraged to visit:

www.njhire.com