NJDOE News

For More Information Contact the Public Information Office:
    Richard Vespucci
    Kathryn Forsyth, Director
    609-292-1126

For Release: April 15, 2008


D.O.E. Receives 25 Applications for Prospective Charter Schools;
Round of Review Begins for Schools Planning September 2009 Openings

Founders representing 25 prospective charter schools have submitted applications in the latest round of the charter school approval process, Commissioner of Education Lucille E. Davy announced today. The proposed schools represent a wide range of approaches and would serve students from urban and suburban communities throughout the state.

“It is clear that interest in charter schools remains strong in New Jersey,” said Commissioner Davy, who noted that the 25 applications received are three more than were received last year in the previous round. “We will now begin a period of rigorous review to determine which applications will be approved.”

Commissioner Davy said the applications received this year are the first under a new timetable for the charter school approval process. She will announce the results of the review of the new applications on or about September 30, 2008. Applications approved at that time will be for schools planning to open in September 2009.

The State Board of Education last year approved the new timetable in revised regulations governing charter schools. The new timetable replaces a timetable with an annual application deadline of July 15, followed by a review period ending with the Commissioner’s annual announcement of approved applications on or about January 15.

Eleven counties are represented among the new applications. Proposed are two high schools, one middle school, and four schools combining middle and high school grades. The remaining proposed schools are elementary schools, with most of them projecting enrollments in grades K-8.

Some new communities, including suburban communities, are represented among the applications. They include Perth Amboy, Millville, Florence, and Winslow Township. Cities that are each already home to several charter schools, such as Paterson, Trenton, Newark and Jersey City, are also represented among the newest proposed schools.

See the attached list for more details about the newest applications. 2008 Prospective Charter Schools.pdf

A charter school is a public school open to all students on a space-available basis that is funded by taxpayers but operates independently of the district board of education under a charter granted by the Commissioner. Once the charter is approved by the Commissioner, the school is managed by a board of trustees deemed to be public agents authorized by the State Board of Education to supervise and control the school.

The Commissioner of Education has the authority to grant a charter for a four-year period and to renew initial charters for a five-year period.

The 62 charter schools expecting to be in operation in 2008-09 are expected to receive $247.9 million in state aid. Forty-six schools (74.2 percent) are receiving revenue increases. State aid for charter schools was held harmless this year and was not capped. Forty-three charter schools are expected to receive a revenue increases of 2 percent or more.

New Jersey currently has 56 charter schools that enroll more than 16,000 students. Six additional prospective charter schools are scheduled to open in September 2008. They are: The Burch Charter School of Excellence, Irvington, Essex County; Camden’s Pride Charter School, Camden, Camden County; Capital Preparatory Charter School, serving students from Ewing and Trenton, Mercer County; Community Charter School of Paterson, Paterson, Passaic County; Paul Robeson Charter School for the Humanities, Trenton, Mercer County; and Pride Academy, serving students from East Orange, Orange and Newark, Essex County.

For more information about charer schools in New Jersey, visit the Department of Education’s Web-site at:

http://www.state.nj.us/education/chartsch/