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Commissioner’s Annual Report to the Education
Committees of the Senate and General Assembly
on Violence, Vandalism and Substance Abuse
in New Jersey Public Schools

July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008

Based on the Electronic Violence
and Vandalism Reporting System (EVVRS)

Lucille E. Davy
Commissioner

Barbara Gantwerk
Assistant Commissioner

Susan B. Martz, Director
Office of Educational Support Services

New Jersey Department of Education
100 River View Plaza, P.O. Box 500
Trenton, NJ 08625-0500

September 2009


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

Legislative Charge

Purpose of the Report

Overall Total and Totals for Major Reporting Categories

Three-Year Trends in Types of Incidents Reported (Table 1)

National and New Jersey Trends in School Crime

Characteristics of Incidents

Disciplinary Action Taken and Program Provided

Offender and Victim Types

Data Summary

Departmental Review of District Records

PROGRAMMATIC RESPONSE

Comprehensive Approach to Prevention

Department Initiatives

Policy

Programs to Support Student Development (N.J.A.C. 6A:16)

School Administrator Procedures: Responding to Critical Incidents

Unsafe School Choice Option (USCO) Policy

Data Collection and Reporting

New Jersey Student Health Survey (NJSHS)

Electronic Violence and Vandalism Reporting System (EVVRS)

School Security Incident Reports (SSIRs)

Title IV-A Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (SDFSCA) Performance Report

School Health Profiles Survey Profiles

Prevention and Intervention Programs and Strategies

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (SDFSCA) Program

Homeland Security Grant

Core Curriculum Content Standards (CCCS)

Intervention and Referral Services (I&RS) Initiatives

Developing Safe and Civil Schools: A Coordinated Approach for Social-Emotional and Character Development (DSACS)

Character Education Initiatives

Truancy Reduction Pilot Project

Social Norms Project

Title IV-A and Unsafe School Choice Option Policy Training and Technical Assistance Project

21st Century Community Learning Centers Programs

New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition

New Jersey Afterschool Network

Drug Abuse Education Fund Project

Collaboration and Technical Support

Governor’s Strategy for Safe Streets and Neighborhoods

Collaboration with Law Enforcement

Collaboration with the New Jersey School Security Task Force

Collaboration with Human Services Agencies and Student Support Staff

Collaboration with Child Welfare Agencies

Other Collaborative Partnerships

Appendix A: Public School Safety Law

Appendix B:  Data Collection Form

Appendix C: Figures 1-20

Appendix D: District Totals by County

Appendix E: Substance and Weapons Detail, 2005-06 - 2007-08

 

INTRODUCTION

Legislative Charge

In 1982, in response to the problem of violence and vandalism in the New Jersey schools, the State Legislature passed the Public School Safety Law (N.J.S.A. 18A:17-48).

The Commissioner of Education shall each year submit a report to the Education Committees of the Senate and General Assembly detailing the extent of violence and vandalism in the public schools and making recommendations to alleviate the problem (see Appendix A). 

Purpose of the Report

The Commissioner’s annual report provides the Legislature with information reported by school districts concerning incidents of serious student misconduct grouped into the following four major reporting categories: violence, vandalism, weapons, and substance abuse.  An analysis of trends yields indications of progress and of ongoing concern, and provides guidance to districts, other agencies, and the department as they endeavor to focus resources on areas of need. In the Programmatic Response section of this report, the department notifies the Legislature and the public of the actions taken by the State Board of Education and the Department of Education to address the problems evident in the data.

FINDINGS

The Findings section summarizes the data reported by districts over the Electronic Violence and Vandalism Reporting System (EVVRS).  Districts are required to report incidents, as defined in the EVVRS, if they occur on school grounds during school hours, on a school bus, or at a school-sponsored event, using the Violence, Vandalism, and Substance Abuse (VV-SA) Incident Reporting Form in Appendix B.  The reporting of this year’s findings is intended to be read in electronic format; the reader can link to figures that depict the findings described in the report.  Paper copies of the figures may be found in Appendix C of the print version of this document. More detailed findings, i.e., district and school summary data, may be accessed at http://www.state.nj.us/education/schools/vandv/.

Overall Total and Totals for Major Reporting Categories  

The total number of incidents reported by districts decreased five percent, a decline of 967 incidents from 18,633 in 2006-07 to 17,666 in 2007-08 (see Appendix D). The following changes are noted in the number of incidents reported in the four major reporting categories over the same period:   violence declined five percent, vandalism declined 11 percent, weapons declined 14 percent, and substance abuse increased four percent.  The decline in reported incidents of vandalism continues a long-term trend and that of incidents involving weapons continues a trend that began in 2004-05 (see Figure 1).

When reporting an incident, districts specify the type of incident within the major category.  In 2007-08:

  • The most frequently occurring types of violence were simple assault, fight, and harassment, intimidation, bullying, threat (HIBT)  (see Figure 2).

  • The two most frequent types of vandalism occurring in New Jersey schools continue to be damage to property and theft (see Figure 3).

  • Weapons other than firearms constitute the most frequently cited type of weapon, and use of substances is the most frequently occurring type of substance offense (see Figure 4).

Three-Year Trends in Types of Incidents Reported (Table 1)

From 2005-06 through 2007-08, most of the types of incidents constituting the four major categories changed little.  Table 1 below, however, shows that in three of the four categories, some incident types exhibited a downward trend, with a few showing increases:

  • Under violence, the number of fights declined slightly (230 or five percent), whereas the number of terroristic threats increased by 70 (or 36 percent);

  • Under vandalism, significant three-year declines can be seen in both the reported number of incidents of property damage (377 or 21 percent) and theft (324 or 20 percent);

  • Under weapons, the incidents involving a weapon other than a firearm declined by 162 or 12 percent; and

  • Under substances, the number of incidents involving alcohol declined from 537 to 446 (17 percent), while incidents involving unauthorized use of prescription drugs increased from 110 in 2005-06 to 195 in 2007-08 (77 percent) (see Appendix E).

The definition of harassment intimidation and bullying (HIB) was changed to include threat for reporting in the 2007-2008 school year. As a result, threat was dropped as a separate offense, and the offense of harassment, intimidation and bullying was changed to harassment, intimidation, bullying, threat (HIBT). The HIBT definition is provided below and includes physical, as well as non-physical acts:

Any gesture, written, verbal, or physical act, or electronic or wireless communication that:

  • a reasonable person should know, under the circumstances, the act will have the effect of alarming (i.e., fear created by imminent danger) or harming (e.g., physically, emotionally) a student or staff member, or of damaging their property; OR

  • has the effect of insulting or demeaning any student or group of students in such a way to cause a disruption in, or to substantially interfere with, the orderly operation of the school.

The HIB definition was changed for the following reasons: 1) Districts frequently confused the offenses of threats and terroristic threats. This confusion contributed, in part, to problems in reporting of terroristic threats due to perceptions of the term “terrorist.” 2) It is difficult to distinguish threats from acts of HIB, since key criteria for HIB include behavior that alarms or places a student in fear or harm to his or her person or fear of damage to his or her property, which is the intended effect of a threat. Additionally, there is a criminal definition of terroristic threat, but there is no criminal definition for threat, adding to the lack of clarity between the two acts and supporting the inclusion of threats to acts of HIB.

Table 1:  All Incidents by Type

 

 

 

 

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Three-Year Change

Incident Type

# of Incidents

# of Incidents

# of Incidents

# of Incidents

Violence

 

 

 

 

Simple Assault

3,390

3,401

3,302

-88

Aggravated Assault

235

250

219

-16

Fight

4,464

4,447

4,234

-230

Gang Fight

63

81

 

 

Robbery/Extortion

63

70

53

-10

Sex Offense

161

205

170

9

Threat*

1,430

1,588

 

 

Terroristic Threat**

195

314

265

70

Harassment/ Intimidation/Bullying*

1,409

1,458

2,976

205

Vandalism

 

 

 

 

Arson

111

115

76

-35

Bomb Threat1

136

113

144

8

Burglary

113

88

80

-33

Damage to Property

1,787

1,511

1,410

-377

Fireworks

90

59

43

-47

Theft

1,584

1,457

1,260

-324

Trespassing

178

124

109

-69

Weapons

 

 

 

 

Firearm2

12

11

9

-3

Other Weapon

1,317

1,269

1,155

-162

Bomb Offense3

1

7

1

0

Substances

 

 

 

 

Use

1,999

2,003

2,102

103

Possession

723

719

717

-6

Distribution

71

86

91

20

1   Includes two fake bombs in 2005-06 and one in 2006-07 and two in 2007-08.
2  Firearm incidents include handgun and rifle incidents only. Air guns and imitation guns are classified as "Other   
   Weapon.”
3  Defined as any explosive device larger than a firecracker, exploded or unexploded.
*  Figures for 2007-08, and difference calculations, include threat with HIB.
** Terroristic Threat was renamed Criminal Threat in 2007-08.

The increase of 205 incidents of HIBT reported in Table 1 and Figure 5 represents a seven percent increase in the total number of HIBT incidents over the three years.1 Over the past two years, the number of schools, reporting HIBT incidents has remained the same (see Figure 6). In 2007-08, more students in grades 7-8 and 9-10 than students in other grades committed acts of HIBT (see Figure 7).

________________________________
1 In producing the 2005-06 and 2006-07 data for this comparison, reports of threats were combined with reports of Harassment, Intimidation, Bullying (HIB); an incident that included both a threat and an HIB incident was counted only once as an incident of HIBT. 

When limiting the analysis to incidents of violence where both the offender and the victim are students, the number of incidents of each type of violence has remained relatively stable over the three-year period, 2005-06 through 2007-08.  The same consistency can be seen generally in the percentage of those incidents that occurred in the classroom (see Table 2).

Table 2:  Incidents of Violence where Offender and Victims were Students*

 

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

 

Incidents

% in Class

Incidents

% in Class

Incidents

% in Class

Types of Violence

 

 

 

 

 

 

Simple Assault

2,784

27%

2,795

25%

2,731

25%

Aggravated Assault

142

23%

114

20%

103

12%

Fight

4,269

22%

4,296

21%

4,135

20%

Robbery/Extortion

39

8%

52

14%

36

11%

Sex Offense

141

38%

174

29%

156

32%

HIBT**

1,855

40%

1,933

41%

2,084

40%

Criminal Threat**

116

47%

175

44%

145

50%

Total Violence

9,282

28%

9,449

27%

9,212

27%

* Includes approximately one hundred cases each year where victim was a non-student, i.e., a community member.

** Harassment, Intimidation, Bullying, Threat.  Threat was added to Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying in 2007-08; in prior years threat incidents were reported in their own category.  Criminal Threat was labeled Terroristic Threat in 2005-06 and 2006-07.

National and New Jersey Trends in School Crime

The year-to-year consistency evident in the violence and vandalism data reported by New Jersey public schools can also be seen in national trends in the data drawn from a variety of sources, including surveys of students, teachers, and principals by the U.S. Department of Education (USDOE) and reported in Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2008, (NCES 2009-022/NCJ 226343).  Data collected by USDOE covers the number of incidents of violence as reported by school principals, including serious violence and theft and perceptions of students of school safety (see Table 3). 

The data reported to NJDOE on the EVVRS are incident data, whereas USDOE data are survey data about incidents, and thus not strictly comparable.  The purpose of this comparison is to provide a context for the trends observed in recent years in EVVRS data, specifically, incidents of theft and violence.   The New Jersey data presented includes New Jersey’s totals reported in prior Commissioner Reports to the Legislature (see Table 4).  The national data are reported from 2001 through 2007. 

National Data on Selected Measure of School Crime

Table 3: Student Self-Reports of School Crime, 2001-2005

 

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

% Change

Rate of Incidents per 1,000 Students, Ages 12-18

Theft

45

40

45

33

33

34

 

-24%

Violence

28

24

28

22

24

29

 

4%

% Students Reporting Victimization, Age 12-18

Theft

4.2%

 

4.0%

 

3.1%

 

3.0%

-29%

Violence

1.8%

 

1.3%

 

1.2%

 

1.6%

-11%

% Students in Grades 9-12 Reporting  Avoiding Activities or One or More Places in School because of fear of harm

Total

6.1%

 

5.0%

 

5.5%

 

7.2%

18%

% Students in Grades 9-12 who felt threatened or were injured with a weapon

Total

8.9%

 

9.2%

 

7.9%

 

7.8%

-12%

New Jersey Trend Data Reported

Table 4: Trends in Incident Totals for Theft and Violence, 2001-2008, EVVRS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percent
Change

 

2000-01

2001-02

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

2001-2005

 2001-2008

Theft

1,784

1,449

1,594

1,489

1,387

1,584

1,457

1,260

-22%

-29%

Violence

15,970

14,677

13,915

12,429

10,953

11,166

11,534

10,998

-31%

-31%

Questions on physical violence and weapons possession are asked on the New Jersey Student Health Survey (NJSHS), a questionnaire completed by a sample of New Jersey public high school students every two years.  A pattern of decline from 2001 through 2005 can be seen for some measures on the survey, followed by a leveling off or increase two years later in the 2007 survey, the same pattern seen in the national data above (see Table 5).

Table 5:  Physical Violence and Weapons Possession, New Jersey

Student Health Survey

 

 

 

 

 

2001

2005

2007

Involved in Physical Fight, Past 12 Months

35%

31%

31%

Carried a Weapon, Past 30 Days

13%

11%

11%

Involved in Physical Fight on School Property, Past 12 Months

13%

10%

10%

Carried a Weapon on School Property, Past 30 Days

7%

3%

4%

Missed School Day because Felt Unsafe

9%

4%

6%

Comparison

The figures in the “Percent Change” column in Table 3 provide a context for the changes observed in New Jersey data over the same time period, 2001-2008, in Table 4 and from 2001 through 2007 in Table 5.   The decline in the two rates of self-reported student victimization for theft in the national data (Table 3) parallels the decline in incidents of theft reported over the EVVRS (Table 4).  The two national rates for violence are mixed, as are the two measures of school safety as measured by reports of students in grades 9-12 (2001-2005, Table 4).  The New Jersey data show a steeper decline over the five-year period of incidents, the percent change over the eight-year period (2001-2008), however, shows a leveling off of the decline in violence incidents. This leveling off pattern is also seen in the results of the survey of New Jersey high school students (Table 5). In sum, the declines observed in the New Jersey theft data can, to some measure, also be seen in declines in the national data, although it is difficult to reach a conclusion when comparing national and New Jersey data related to violence.  The New Jersey data on incidents of violence have leveled off over the past two years (2005 to 2007), while the national data do not exhibit a discernable trend across the four measures related to violence.

Characteristics of Incidents 

Location

As in previous years, three incidents in ten (30 percent) occurred in the classroom.  In fact, the distribution of the data describing incident location has remained stable over the last four reporting years (see Figure 8).  The data were analyzed to determine if violence and weapons incidents tended to occur in the same locations as incidents of vandalism.  The distribution of incidents is similar for the two groups of incidents; however, more incidents of violence and weapons (see Figure 9) occur in school corridors (24 percent vs. 11 percent for vandalism) and more vandalism (see Figure 10) occurs in other locations inside the school (30 percent vs. 13 percent).

The preponderance of incidents occurring in the classroom involve violence (see Figure 11); the most frequently occurring type of violence in the classroom is HIBT, followed by assault and fight (see Figure 12).

Gang-Related Incidents

Prior to 2007-08, the EVVRS collected data on gang fights.  In this reporting year, districts reported if an incident, regardless of the category, was related to gang membership.  Of the 51, gang-related incidents reported, seven in ten (71 percent) were incidents of violence (see Figure 13). 

Police Notification

Police were notified in nearly two incidents in five (38 percent); a complaint was filed with or by the police in nearly 3,500 cases (20 percent) (see Figure 14).

Disciplinary Action Taken and Program Provided

More than nine disciplinary actions in ten (93 percent) were short-term suspensions, defined as one to nine days (see Figure 15).  Nearly half of all suspensions were from two to four days (see Figure 16).  Home instruction was the most frequent program provided to the recipient of the disciplinary action (see Figure 17).

Offender and Victim Types

Offenders

Regarding all incidents across the four major reporting categories, general education students were the most frequent offenders.  Relative to their numbers in the student population (17 percent); however, students with disabilities constituted a greater proportion of offenders.  Offender Unknown is recorded by districts in the case of vandalism (e.g., arson, damage to property) where the perpetrator is not identified. (see Figure 18.)

Victims

General education students were the victims in the majority of cases.  School personnel were the victims in slightly more cases than are students with disabilities (see Figure 19).  Staff, i.e., school personnel, were the victim of HIBT more than any other type of incident (see Figure 20).  The percentage of student victims of violence who were male did not change over the past three years (66 percent in 2005-06, 65 percent in 2006-07 and 2007-08). 

Data Summary

In 2006-07, the total number of incidents reported statewide declined slightly from the previous year, decreasing by 967 incidents or five percent.  Incidents of violence (five percent), vandalism (11 percent) and weapons (four percent) accounted for this decrease.  Over the three-year period from 2005-06 through 2007-08, the types of incident that declined the most were fight (violence), property damage and theft (vandalism), and weapons other than firearms. Over the three-year period, the number of incidents of HIBT increased slightly, but from 2006-07 to 2007-08, the number of schools reporting HIBT incidents did not change.

The pattern of location in which incidents occurred did not change in 2007-08 with 30 percent of all incidents occurring in the classroom, the preponderance of those involving violence.  When students were both offenders and victims, the percentage of incidents of violence occurring in the classroom did not change over three years (28 percent in 2005-06, and 27 percent in 2006-07 and 2007-08). 

A significant proportion of the victims of offenses continued to be school personnel, who were victims of HIBT offenses more than any other type.  An analysis of victim data by gender was conducted for incidents where the offender and victim were both students.  Of all student victims, two victims in three were male students.

Overall, the EVVRS data are characterized by their stability; there were no major shifts in the 2007-08 in the data, in the number of incidents, in their attributes, e.g., location, or in the number or distribution of offender and victim types.

Departmental Review of District Records

In 2005-06, the department surveyed 19 school districts that either reported a decline of at least 100 incidents of violence over a three-year period (between 2002-03 and 2004-05) or reported at least 50 incidents of violence in 2002-03 and a decline of at least 50 percent over the same period. These districts were asked to confirm and verify figures submitted in 2004-05 and to explain the reasons for the decline.

All 19 school districts responded to the confirmation request.  The majority attributed the decline to a multiplicity of responses to the problem rather than one action or program.  These responses included the following: alignment of local reporting standards with criteria in incident definitions; administrative actions both to reduce the level of violence in schools and to ensure the accurate reporting of incidents; enhanced linkages and communication with the community;  the implementation of new curricula, non-curricular programs and additional student support services; and changes in the student population.

As reported last year, the department developed a protocol to verify the local standards for reporting that entailed an on-site review of documents such as suspension forms used for recording incidents of misconduct for which a school imposed a consequence.  The selection of districts to monitor is based upon multiple criteria as follows:  a significant three-year decline in incidents reported; a gap between the expected and actual number of incidents reported (based on a statistical analysis of three years of EVVRS data); observations made by teams carrying out site visits as part of the New Jersey Quality Single Accountability System (QSAC) and other reviews; and written complaints filed with the department alleging noncompliance with regulations or statutes.   During the 2007-08 school year, the department continued to use the protocol to conduct records reviews and interviews in six schools in four of these 19 districts (including one charter school).  Visits to an additional six schools in four districts were conducted in the spring of 2008-09.  The department plans to integrate aspects of the EVVRS protocol into QSAC monitoring during the 2009-10 school year.

PROGRAMMATIC RESPONSE

Comprehensive Approach to Prevention

Violence, as is the case with many community problems, can become manifest in schools. The NJDOE and local school staff persistently strive to make school environments safe, secure, and optimal settings for promoting student learning and growth. The most effective strategies for the prevention of school violence and related at-risk student behavior involve continuous vigilance and proactive, coordinated efforts among all facets of the community for the maintenance of supportive and disciplined school environments.

State and local interagency collaborations have enhanced educators’ capacities to cultivate positive learning conditions and to address complex student problems. A growing recognition among representatives from state and local partner agencies regarding the importance of data-driven decision-making and the use of research-based practices has contributed to more focused and functional program efforts and more efficient use of resources.

In the interest of advancing the overarching goals of preventing, reducing, and effectively managing incidences of violence, vandalism, and substance abuse, the NJDOE and its partner state agencies support a diverse array of initiatives designed to help schools achieve the following objectives:

  • To protect the health, safety, security, and welfare of school populations;
  • To establish and maintain civil educational climates;
  • To prevent at-risk student behaviors;
  • To intervene with and remediate at-risk student behaviors at all stages of identification;
  • To provide supportive services for staff, students, and their families; and
  • To prevent, intervene in, respond to, and recover from emergency and crisis situations.

Programs, services, and activities designed to support these aims are at the heart of school safety.  There have been important gains in our knowledge from the research literature in the last two decades on the types of school-based strategies that have proven to be effective in creating safe, supportive, disciplined and drug-free schools.  At their core, all of the evidence-based school strategies for preventing problem student behaviors and for fostering positive student development are designed to advance the following protective factors:

  • Student engagement in learning;
  • Student attachment to school; and
  • Student acquisition of the social skills, which have been reported in the research literature to result in measurable positive effects on academic performance, student retention and reductions in violence, substance abuse, and related at-risk student behaviors. 

Schools are most likely to prevent problem student behaviors and promote student well-being and success through comprehensive, coordinated and systematically planned programs, services and activities designed to develop student’s abilities to identify and manage emotions, make healthy decisions, establish constructive relationships, develop caring and concern for others and effectively manage challenging situations.  The NJDOE’s initiatives are designed to help schools embrace and cultivate the strategies, increase the factors that protect students from engaging in at-risk behavior (e.g., unexcused absences, conduct problems, poor school performance, substance abuse, gang involvement,) and achieve the purposes described above.

Department Initiatives

School districts, county agencies and state agencies continue to coordinate and collaborate on programmatic responses that foster school safety, ranging from at-risk behavior prevention to threat assessment, intervention, crisis response, and recovery.  The NJDOE’s ongoing responses to at-risk student behaviors and unsafe educational circumstances include:

  • Development and consistent application of clearly defined codes of student conduct and policies and procedures, including strategies for addressing harassment, intimidation, and bullying and student attendance and truancy;
  • Assessment of the immediate school surroundings, as well as the social and emotional learning climates of the school communities; and
  • Development of comprehensive school safety and security plans that incorporate clearly  defined procedures and mechanisms for responding to and recovering from emergencies and crises.

The following district improvement initiatives support general prevention efforts because they focus on establishing school climates that are supportive, respectful and caring; creating meaningful adult-student relationships; providing learning experiences that are relevant and rigorous; and giving students the support needed to help them stay engaged and succeed in school:

  • Implementation of the Secondary Education Redesign Initiative, which focuses on redesigning middle schools and high schools through action steps and supportive policies that align content standards, assessments and high school graduation requirements with college and workplace expectations.  It also offers coherent, integrated reform strategies and structures that support students, educators and other members of the education community to assist high schools in graduating students who are college and work ready;
  • Administration of a pilot program on the development of Personalized Student Learning Plans, a component of the NJDOE’s Secondary Education Redesign Initiative that are designed to use adult mentors, including parents, teachers and counselors, to help students recognize and achieve their goals. The learning plan formats developed by districts in the NJDOE’s pilot program will include at least the following three areas of development- personal, academic and career;
  • Development of Professional Learning Communities in which schools are characterized as learning organizations united by a shared vision of student and staff learning and mutually accepted values of respect and caring, and in which staff and students function interdependently to achieve shared goals for which they are collectively accountable;
  • Utilization of data for more effective targeting of resources and tracking of progress and outcomes;
  • Implementation of evidence-based prevention and intervention programs; and
  • Development of plans for the effective use of available school and community resources.

The NJDOE plans to continue to expand its efforts to improve school safety. The following major initiatives are intended to prevent problem student behaviors, foster positive student development, and promote safe, disciplined and drug-free schools. The school safety initiatives and activities highlighted below are organized under the following categories:

1) Policy,

2) Data Collection and Reporting,

3) Prevention and Intervention Programs and Strategies, and

4) Collaboration and Technical Support.

Policy

Programs to Support Student Development (N.J.A.C. 6A:16)

Description:     Originally adopted in 2001 and re-adopted in 2006, these regulations set minimum standards for district boards of education in establishing policies and procedures and in operating programs in the following areas:

  • School Health Services (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-2) – Includes requirements for health services policies and procedures, health services, personnel, student records, and school health services to nonpublic schools;
  • Comprehensive Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Abuse Programs (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-3) – Includes the purposes for comprehensive substance abuse programs, from prevention, to intervention and referral, to continuity of care, and requirements for in-service training, parent education, tobacco use, and confidentiality;
  • Procedures for Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Intervention (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-4) – Includes substance abuse policy requirements and required procedures for students suspected of being under the influence of substances or of using steroids and for voluntary random student alcohol or drug testing programs;
  • School Safety and Security (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-5) – Includes requirements for school safety and security plans, School Violence Awareness Week, violence public hearings, violence incident reporting, access to juvenile justice information and student removals for firearms, assaults with weapons and assaults on district employees;
  • Law Enforcement Operations for Alcohol, Other Drugs, Weapons and Safety (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-6) – Includes requirements for cooperation between school staff and law enforcement authorities, including the establishment and annual review of the Memorandum of Agreement Between Education and Law Enforcement Officials;
  • Student Conduct (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-7) – Includes requirements for codes of student conduct, short- and long-term suspensions, expulsions, conduct away from school grounds, attendance and truancy, harassment, intimidation and bullying, and student records and confidentiality;
  • Intervention and Referral Services (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-8) – Includes requirements for the establishment and operation of multidisciplinary teams in each school, in which general education students are served, for addressing learning, behavior, or health difficulties;
  • Alternative Education Programs (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-9) – Includes requirements for alternative education programs established and operated by either a district board of education or a state agency, public college-operated program or NJDOE-approved school;
  • Home or Out-of-School Instruction (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-10) – Includes requirements for the provision of instruction due to temporary or chronic health conditions or for general education students for reasons other than a temporary or chronic health condition; and
  • Reporting Potentially Missing or Abused Children (N.J.A.C. 6A:16-11) – Includes requirements for the early detection, reporting to and cooperation with law enforcement and child welfare authorities.

Supportive Resources:

School Administrator Procedures: Responding to Critical Incidents

Description: The NJDOE has developed these procedures for school administrators in collaboration with the School Security Task Force.  The procedures are model guides for active shooter scenarios, lockdown situations, bomb threats, evacuations, and public information scenarios.  Each school is required to individualize the procedures for its specific school and community.

Supportive Resources:

Unsafe School Choice Option (USCO) Policy

Under the USCO policy for the 2008-2009 school year, one persistently dangerous school was identified, three schools were identified as being in early warning status, and one special services school was directed to develop a school safety plan.  Training and technical assistance were provided to assigned NJDOE staff for supporting the designated schools.  The NJDOE staff provided ongoing technical assistance to identified schools in the fulfillment of their obligations under the USCO Policy, including the development and implementation of corrective action plans.

Supportive Resources: The following USCO policy resources can be found at http://www.nj.gov/education/grants/nclb/guidance/usco/:

Data Collection and Reporting

New Jersey Student Health Survey (NJSHS)

Description: The NJSHS is administered bi-annually among a statewide sample of public school students.  This survey, which is based on the Youth Risk Behavior Survey sponsored by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, asks students to self-report on their actions and attitudes in six areas that are highly related to preventable, high-risk behaviors and premature injury or illness.  The survey contains items on lifetime and recent use of alcohol, tobacco and marijuana, as well as lifetime use of other drugs.  Concerning violence, the survey includes questions related to carrying weapons, fighting, having been hit by a boyfriend or girlfriend, having been forced to have sex, and having considered or tried to commit suicide.
The 2009 survey instrument contains items drawn from the New Jersey High School Survey of Risk and Protective Factors, administered by the New Jersey Department of Human Services’ Division of Addiction Services, that measure school and peer domain protective factors.  The NJDOE uses the findings to gauge progress in reducing the various high-risk student behaviors and to identify needs for programming.  In general, the findings are used by state agencies for planning, program assessment, and reporting to the federal government.

Supportive Resources:            

Electronic Violence and Vandalism Reporting System (EVVRS)

  • Description: Pursuant to N.J.S.A. 18A:17-46 and N.J.A.C. 6A:16-5.3, school district employees are required to report student acts of violence. Districts enter information about individual incidents, including offender and victim information, into the EVVRS. The data, once verified by chief school administrators, form the basis of the Findings section of this report to the State Legislature and of the reports to the United States Department of Education on the implementation of the federal Gun-Free Schools Act and the Unsafe School Choice Option policy.

Supportive Resources: 

School Security Incident Reports (SSIRs)

Description: The NJDOE requires school district officials to submit an SSIR, as soon as possible, during or following a major incident in their districts.  District officials forward the completed SSIR via electronic mail (e-mail) to the appropriate county office of education.  After county office review, the SSIR is forwarded, via e-mail, to the NJDOE.  The following are examples of major incidents that would require the completion of the SSIR:

  • Sexual misconduct or assault – either by a student or a staff member,
  • Arrest of a student or a staff member,
  • Bomb threat,
  • Overt gang activity or fight,
  • School closing or early dismissal,
  • Intruder in school or on school grounds,
  • School lockdown, and
  • Active shooter situation.

The SSIR submission and review process is time-sensitive, meaning that a district may have numerous report submissions depending on the incidents; whereas, for example, reports entered into the EVVRS are cumulative.  Therefore, district officials are asked to complete and forward the SSIR in a timely manner.  The NJDOE’s Office of the Chief of Staff uses the information provided in the SSIRs for the following purposes:

  • To assess whether a school, school district or region of the state needs specific targeted assistance;
  • To determine how schools and school districts respond to various incidents; and

To keep the Commissioner of Education and the Governor’s Office abreast of all current school security incidents and trends.

Supportive Resources:

On April 27, 2009, a memo and an updated School Security Incident Report form that included an FAQ sheet was disseminated from the Commissioner of Education to district chief school administrators and charter school lead persons, regarding the reporting of school security incidents.

Title IV-A Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (SDFSCA) Performance Report

Description: Districts that receive funds under the Federal SDFSCA (Title IV-A of the No Child Left Behind Act), must complete a report regarding their use of SDFSCA funds.  In the 2007-2008 report, districts reported on their programmatic approaches to the prevention of substance abuse and violence; their involvement of and consultations with parent and other community members; their utilization of school resource officers and substance awareness coordinators; their use of data in prevention planning and evaluation; the number of referrals of students to school-based and external agencies for problems related to substance use, steroid use and tobacco smoking; and the adoption of policies on voluntary policies for random testing of student alcohol or other drug use and the number and status of tests administered under the policies.

Supportive Resources:  A report detailing the results of the 2007 and 2008 surveys will be available in the fall of 2009.

School Health Profiles Survey Profiles

Description: The School Health Profiles Survey, sponsored by United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is conducted biennially by state and local education and health agencies among middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers.  The findings from the Profiles provide information on the characteristics of and trends in school-health education; physical education; health services; school health policies related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) prevention; tobacco-use prevention; violence prevention; physical activity; competitive foods (i.e., foods and beverages sold outside of the United States Department of Agriculture school meal programs); and family and community involvement in school health programs. In the fall of 2008, the Profiles survey was mailed to 425 secondary schools in New Jersey.

Supportive Resources:  

  • The results of the 2008 New Jersey Profiles Survey will be available in the Fall 2009.
  • A report on other states’ administration of the School Health Profiles: Characteristics of Health Programs Among Secondary Schools 2006, and information about uses of the survey may be accessed at the survey Web site of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/profiles/.

Prevention and Intervention Programs and Strategies

Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (SDFSCA) Program

Description: The capacity for local school response to behavioral, social-emotional and health problems is supplemented by federal funding provided specifically for school violence and substance-abuse prevention activities. The SDFSCA is the NJDOE’s sole source of funding dedicated to supporting all local educational agencies (i.e., school districts, charter schools, private nonprofit schools) in New Jersey in the development, implementation, and evaluation of comprehensive programs and activities, which are coordinated with other school and community-based services and programs. School district applications for these formula funds are submitted as part of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) - Consolidated Formula Subgrant to foster the coordination and effective use of all NCLB and other school resources.

Target Population:  All public and nonpublic school students in New Jersey in grades K-12 (ages 5-17). 
Time Period:   FY09.

Funding (Amount and Source):  A total of $5.5 million ($5.1 million federal allocation and $400,000 carryover funds) was made available to school districts in 2008-2009 under the SDFSCA. The federal allocation represented a 37% ($2.6 million) reduction in federal funding provided to school districts under the SDFSCA from the amount provided in the 2005-2006 school years and a 43% total reduction in the amount available to school districts in the 2002-2003 school year. There has been a reduction of $4,190,154 in the annual allocation of SDFSCA funds to New Jersey since FY2003, from a total of $11,130,853 in FY03 to a total of $6,940,699 in FY09.
Supportive Resources:            

Homeland Security Grant

Description: The NJDOE was awarded a grant from the New Jersey Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness for the 2007-2008 calendar year and for the 2008-2010 school years.  Funding from this grant is being used to support two key school safety and security goals.  The first goal is to increase the critical infrastructure protection of school facilities and school staff and students by ensuring that schools are identifying and reducing vulnerabilities, and they are practiced and prepared to efficiently and effectively respond to critical incidents.  The second goal is to provide training and direct assistance services to school staff in the review of local school safety and security plans, procedures, best practices, and target-hardening initiatives.

Within its Office of the Chief of Staff, the NJDOE employs two safety and security planners under the grant and a state-funded position to provide services to schools for the planning, coordination and maintenance of safety and security for students, staff and school facilities.  These dedicated positions provide technical support to school staff for the implementation of the School Sector’s Best Practices outlined in the School Safety and Security Manual: Best Practices Guidelines and the School Administrator Procedures: Responding to Critical Incidents publications developed in support of N.J.A.C. 6A:16-5.1,School safety and security plans.  These staff members, who comprise the NJDOE’s School Security Unit, created a comprehensive training plan that resulted in statewide and regional trainings that concentrated on the information provided in the publication titled, School Administrator Procedures: Responding to Critical Incidents.

The NJDOE’s training and technical assistance activities have facilitated effective school crisis and emergency management planning, preparedness, and responses.  The training and technical assistance also have improved local collaboration and expertise on best practices for school safety and security.  Between the 2007-2009 academic years, the NJDOE provided approximately 4,400 people with training and services dedicated to school safety and security.  These interactions have helped the NJDOE identify areas of development and revision for statewide policies and protocols intended to assist with statewide safety and security coordination.

The staff members of the School Security Unit address safety and security needs of schools identified by the NJDOE, in cooperation with the School Security Task Force (SSTF) and the Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force (DSPTF).  The School Security Unit staff conducts school site visits, reviews school safety plans and procedures, provides direct technical assistance to schools statewide and provides statewide, regional, and local training to educators on safety and security issues.  These NJDOE staff members also collaborate with the Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, the Office of the Attorney General, Office of Emergency Management, state Police, other state, county, and local agencies, and critical infrastructure sectors identified by the SSTF and DSPTF for the statewide coordination of services designed to support school safety and security.

Target Population:  All public and nonpublic school administrators and staff serving grades K-12. 
Time Period:   September 1, 2008 through June 30, 2010.

Funding (Amount and Source):  $194,030 in State Homeland Security Program grant funds.

Supportive Resources:

Core Curriculum Content Standards (CCCS)

Description:    Regulations for CCCS (N.J.A.C. 6A:8) in Comprehensive Health and Physical Education were adopted by the State Board of Education in April 2004. The CCCS in Comprehensive Health and Physical Education (CHPE) contain specific indicators under Standards 2.3 (Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs), 2.1 (Health Promotion and Disease Prevention - wellness concepts and skills), 2.2 (Personal, Interpersonal and Life Skills - health enhancing personal, interpersonal and life skills) and 2.4 ( Human Sexuality and Family Life – physical, emotional and social aspects of human relationships and sexuality) that require public schools to teach substance abuse and violence prevention skills, including media resistance, peer pressure resistance, peer leadership, problem-solving, conflict resolution and stress management. Topical strands infused in each of the CCCS in CHPE help teachers locate specific content and skills related to substance abuse and violence prevention.  The standards are further defined by progress indicators at grades two, four, six, eight, and twelve.

Target Population: All public school students in grades K-12.

Time Period: Ongoing. (The existing CCCS regulations are being updated.)

Supportive Resources:

  • The Core Curriculum Content Standards can be found at http://www.state.nj.us/education/code/current/title6a/chap8.pdf.
  • The Curriculum Framework for Health and Physical Education (1999), which can be found at http://www.state.nj.us/njded/frameworks/chpe/index.html, includes 140 suggested sample lessons for educators to use to address topics related to violence prevention and positive social and emotional development.  The New Jersey CCCS in CHPE provide an age-appropriate and culturally sensitive focus that helps students develop the knowledge and skills that lead to healthy, active lifestyles.
  • Additionally, the NJDOE developed and disseminated a CCCS program in CD format which links new activities to the standards, including the Comprehensive Health and Physical Education standard. The program, which was developed in collaboration with the Newark Teachers Union and Seton Hall University, can be found at http://www.ntuaft.com/njcccs/Webpage/Main%20CCCS%20Page.htm, and is linked on the NJDOE’s Office of Academic and Professional Standards Web page at http://www.nj.gov/njded/aps/cccs/.

Intervention and Referral Services (I&RS) Initiatives

Description: The NJDOE’s I&RS initiatives support implementation of the I&RS regulations at N.J.A.C. 6A:16-8. The regulations require the establishment of building-based (grades K-12) multidisciplinary problem-solving teams to assist students who are experiencing learning, behavior or health difficulties and to assist staff who have difficulties in addressing students’ learning, behavior, or health needs.  The technical assistance to I&RS teams provided by the NJDOE includes the following activities:

  • I&RS Technical Assistance Project – This cooperative project between the NJDOE and Stockton College is designed to provide telephone, on-site and Web-based support, guidance, technical assistance and consultation; administer and deliver statewide, regional and local professional development programs; provide regional, county, local and Web-based forums for school staff to network and share information; and develop and disseminate materials to support school building and school district staff in the effective implementation of the I&RS regulations and the NJDOE’s best practices in support ofthe regulations.
  • I&RS Resource Materials
    • Resource Manual for Intervention and Referral Services – The manual was developed by the NJDOE to provide school staff with resources for fulfilling their obligations under N.J.A.C. 6A:16-8 and for implementing I&RS best practices. The NJDOE is currently revising the manual, which is planned to be disseminated in the 2009-2010 school year.
    • I&RS Program Materials – This set of materials, distributed by the NJDOE to all school districts in September 2005, was created to support school-based I&RS team members in fulfilling the requirements of the I&RS regulations; to assist in the provision of professional development programs for staff; and to increase community awareness of the I&RS regulations. The set of materials includes:
      • A four-part series, prepared in VHS videotape and DVD formats, with the following titles – Program Overview (Part 1), Planning and Organizing the Program (Part 2), The I&RS Process (Part 3) and Innovations and Best Practices (Part 4);
      • An I&RS program flyer, which contains concise descriptions of the I&RS technical support materials made available by the NJDOE; and
      • A CD-ROM containing an electronic file of the Resource Manual for Intervention and Referral Services, sample forms and other supportive information and resources.
  • Professional Development – The NJDOE, in collaboration with Stockton College, continues to provide professional development programs to prepare I&RS team members to perform basic I&RS functions and to supplement the NJDOE’s I&RS team training program by assisting school districts in addressing their ongoing professional development needs in support of I&RS teams, pursuant to N.J.A.C. 6A:16-8.2(a)4 and 5.
    • I&RS Team Training –Teams of staff from approximately 1,354 schools
    • Supplemental I&RS Training - Four new supplemental training programs were delivered in 2008-2009:
      • “Structuring the Classroom: Utilizing Functional Behavior Assessment to Minimize Off-Task Behavior in Middle Schools and High Schools” (64 participants);
      • “Managing Mental Health Disorders in the Classroom” (134 participants);
      • “Engaging the Disaffected Student:  Analyzing and Responding to Student Behavior Issues” (80 participants); and
      • “Behavioral Management Strategies for Creating a Productive Learning Environment and Minimizing Behavioral Disruptions” (65 participants).
  • Seven additional supplemental training programs have been provided since 2005:
  • “One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Strategies to Address Learning and Behavior Problems of Elementary School Students” (351 participants);
  • “One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Strategies to Address Learning and Behavior Problems of Middle School Students” (330 participants);
  • “One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Strategies to Address the Learning and Behavior Problems of High School Students” (180 participants);
  • “One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Strategies to Address the Learning and Behavior Problems of Students in Grades K-4 Follow-up” (45 participants);
  • “One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Strategies to Address the Learning and Behavior Problems of Middle Grades Students Follow-up” (45 participants); and
  • “One Size Does Not Fit All: Developing Strategies to Address the Learning and Behavior Problems of High School Students Follow-up” (45 participants).

A course titled, “A Crash Course in the Brain: Using Current Knowledge to Understand Students’ Difficulties and Help Them Succeed” (400participants), was provided in each year from 2005-2008.

  • I&RS Data Collection Project – This project was designed to gather information on the degree, quality and effects of the implementation of the regulations at N.J.A.C. 6A:16-8, Intervention and Referral Services and the NJDOE’s best practices model for implementing the I&RS regulations. Through the use of surveys and interviews of school district and school building staff, the project provided the NJDOE with information for planning programs, services, materials and other activities to support schools in establishing and maintaining an effective coordinated system, using a multidisciplinary team approach, for the planning and delivery of I&RS to assist students who experience learning, behavior or health difficulties and to assist staff who experience difficulties in addressing students’ learning, behavior or health needs, in accordance with the regulations at N.J.A.C. 6A:16-8.

Target Population:  Building-based I&RS team members, school administrators, and other school staff responsible for or involved with I&RS team operations.

Time Period:

  • I&RS Technical Assistance Project – September 1, 2008 through August 31, 2009.
  • I&RS Data Collection Project – May 1, 2007 through December 31, 2008.

Funding (Amount and Source):   

  • $400,000 for the I&RS Technical Assistance Project in federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds.
  • $75,000 for the I&RS Data Collection Project) in federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds.

Supportive Resources:                        

Developing Safe and Civil Schools: A Coordinated Approach for Social-Emotional and Character Development (DSACS)

Description:    The NJDOE is collaborating with Rutgers University to provide technical support to schools in fully integrating social-emotional and character development (SECD) throughout their educational programs.  a primary tenet of the project is that successful performance of students can be enhanced through supportive SECD programs and services that are designed to increase coordination and decrease program and service gaps and overlap among SECD and other educational initiatives. 
The training, technical assistance, and other supportive services and resources provided or coordinated by Rutgers University under the fourth year of this five-year  project are intended to assist school staff in organizing the various resources, programs, and services to create strong SECD conditions, designed to result in reduced at-risk student behavior, the development of positive learning climates and improved academic performance among students in participating schools.  A key component of years four and five of this project is the comprehensive evaluation of DSACS services in a cohort of 60 schools by tracking particular behavior indicators both prior to and after DSACS services have been provided and the SECD programs in the schools have been cohesively administered: this is in addition to the ongoing services provided to the 186 schools that participated in any of the first four years of the project. 
Target Population:     

  • 60 schools in the evaluation component for year four.
  • 186 schools or school districts in various stages of participation in years one through four.

Time Period:   September 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.

Funding (Amount and Source):  $369,422,000 in federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds.

Supportive Resources:  Information can be obtained at the DSACS project Web site found at http://www.secd-sdfspartners.com.

Other Relevant Resources: Research, articles, publications and other information on SECD can be found at the Web site of the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning found at www.casel.org.

Character Education Initiatives

Description:     The Federal Partnerships in Character Education Program (PCEP) grant awarded to the NJDOE in 2006 supports efforts designed to incorporate character education into the mainstream of changes occurring in curriculum standards and student services by addressing the following purposes: 1) increasing the capacity of New Jersey school systems to implement and sustain social-emotional and character education (SECD) programs in the context of current state reform efforts; and 2) evaluating the impact of character education on the social inclusion of students with disabilities.  The NJDOE convenes a Statewide Advisory Board, which facilitates collaboration among multiple offices within the NJDOE on SECD issues, and has created, at Rutgers University, the Center for Social and Character Development (CSCD) to provide school staff with in-depth technical assistance and opportunities for professional development and skill enhancement.

Under the PCEP grant, the following activities are being implemented for the purpose of informing best practices and/or targeted technical assistance regarding SECD:

  • Fostering Change in School Culture through Character Education - Through an application process, five teams, each consisting of one recognized NJ School of Character and one novice school, were selected to participate in this opportunity to improve the quality of their SECD programs.  The teams focused on improving professional practice and student outcomes through guidance, support and assessment activities and participated in orientation and project meetings and shared their results at a final showcase event on May 28, 2009.
  • Caring Schools Inclusion Project (CSIP) - Twelve school districts were identified to participate in this four-year project that is designed to increase the quality and success of each school’s inclusion of students with disabilities into the general education program.  The CSIP initiative examines the effectiveness of implementing an evidence-based character education school-wide intervention, Community of Caring, to create a school culture that provides opportunities for growth and development for all children and to improve engagement, social participation, and a perceived sense of autonomy of children with disabilities. 
  • Code of Student Conduct Pilot Program - This training program was developed based on the findings of a pilot project offered in the 2007-2008 program year with three school districts (Cherry Hill, Highland Park and Montvale). Each district received intensive services relative to the implementation of N.J.A.C. 6A:16-7.1. The CSCD is providing full-day regional trainings to assist local school districts in reviewing and developing their district codes of student conduct to comply with existing regulatory requirements.   Results from these trainings will be used to inform future guidance to school districts regarding the development of the code of student conduct and any potential training or consultation from the department.

Target Population: All public and nonpublic schools.

Funding: $710,482 ($646,158 in Federal Character Education funds and $64,324 in federal  Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds).

Time Period: October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009.

Support Resources: Resources, best practices and other information can be obtained at the CSCD Web site located at http://www.secd-sdfspartners.com

Truancy Reduction Pilot Project

Description:    The NJDOE is providing funding and resource and technical support for this project, which is designed to reduce student truancy and increase student engagement in learning in the schools of six cities in New Jersey identified under theGovernor’s Plan for Safe Streets and Neighborhoods. The project is being led by the Office of the Attorney General (OAG) in partnership with the NJDOE, the Juvenile Justice Commission, the Administrative Office of the Courts, the Department of Children and Families and the Department of State, as well as with the teams of school and community stakeholders in each of the six pilot cities.  Consultation services are being provided to the partner state agencies and to the pilot cities by the National Center for School Engagement (NCSE).

Target Population:  Asbury Park, Paterson, Newark, Camden, Vineland, and Trenton.

Time Period:   January 1, 2009 through January 29, 2010.

Funding (Amount and Source):  $104,800 in federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds.

Supportive Resources:   The following Web sites contain information related to the project:

Social Norms Project

Description: The NJDOE continues to collaborate with the Center for Addiction Studies and Awareness (CASA) at Rowan University to implement the fourth year of a five-year project that uses established social psychological principles concerning the influence of group norms on individual behavior to achieve the following purposes: 1) reduce bullying, harassment, and intimidation behavior among students in participating New Jersey middle schools; and 2) reduce the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs among students in participating New Jersey high schools. Under the Social Norms Project, CASA performs assessments to determine actual norms regarding alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use and bullying, harassment, and intimidation behavior in participating schools, as appropriate, and develops and implements marketing campaigns to inform students, school staff, parents and other community members of these norms.

Target Population:  19 New Jersey middle schools and 15 high schools.

Time Period: October 1, 2009 through September 2010.

Funding (Amount and Source):  $250,000 in Federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds.

Supportive Resources:   Information can be found at the project Web site located at http://www.rowan.edu/casa/currentprojects/njdesnp.html.

Other Relevant Resources: Additional information on the social norms approach to the prevention of problem behavior can be found at the Web site of the National Social Norms Institute found at http://www.socialnorms.org/.

Title IV-A and Unsafe School Choice Option Policy Training and Technical Assistance Project

Description: This initiative, in collaboration with the Center for Applied Psychology at Rutgers University, provides school district and NJDOE staff with technical assistance, training programs, resource development, support and information services for the successful implementation of the requirements of the federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (SDFSCA) and N.J.A.C. 6A:16-3, 4, 6 and 7. The project also provides assistance to schools identified as either persistently dangerous or in early warning status as well as to special services schools identified under the NJDOE’s federally-mandated Unsafe School Choice Option (USCO) policy for the purpose of developing corrective action or school safety plans, as appropriate, to reduce the number of incidents of violence in the identified schools, as determined based on the data collected in the Electronic Violence and Vandalism Reporting System.

Approximately 1,450 school staff members have participated in workshops offered by project staff since 2007.  Workshops have been provided on the following topics:

  • “Planning and Implementing a Comprehensive Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug (ATOD) Abuse Prevention Program” (87 participants);
  • “Conducting Practical Needs Assessments” (134 participants);
  • “Evaluating the Comprehensive ATOD Abuse Program for Results” (267 participants);
  • “Reviewing Your District’s Harassment, Intimidation and Bullying Policy” (99 participants);
  • “Effective Collaborations with Parents and Community Members and Community Organizations” (101 participants); and
  • “Addressing Harassment, Intimidation, and Bullying from Policy to Practice” (549 participants).

Target Population: General project services are available to all school staff (grades K-12). Services provided in support of the USCO policy are available to all school and NJDOE staff responsible for implementation of the NJDOE’s USCO policy.

Time Period:   November 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009.

Funding (Amount and Source):  $249,513 in federal Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act funds.

Supportive Resources:   Project information, including Web-based resources (e.g., a searchable database of scientifically research-based programs), workshop videos, PowerPoint  presentations, guides, tip sheets, and program handouts are available on the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities (SDFSC) Project Web site at http://www.secd-sdfspartners.com.

21st Century Community Learning Centers Programs

Description: Under Title IV, Part B of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001, 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) are defined as centers that offer academic remediation and enrichment activities in tandem with a broad array of other enrichment activities in the areas of arts and culture, youth development, physical activity and parental involvement to students and their adult family members when school is not in session.  The program aims to provide engaging and enriching extended learning opportunities in a safe and welcoming environment for all youth and their families that encourage positive social skills, innovative thinking, exploration, creativity and problem-solving skills, while assisting the students in attaining the skills necessary to meet New Jersey’s Core Curriculum Content Standards.  Currently, there are 42 programs throughout 121 sites across New Jersey that have enrolled over 19,000 students.

Target Population: The purpose of the 21st CCLC Program is to supplement the education of students in grades 4-12, who attend schools eligible for Title I schoolwide programs or schools where a minimum of 30 percent of the students are from low-income families.

Time Period: July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2009

Funding (Amount and Source):$ 20,170,012in federalNCLB, Title IV, Part B funds.

Supportive Resources

Other Relevant Resources:

New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition

Description:  Since 2003, OESS has contracted, through a cooperative grant agreement, with the New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition (NJSACC) to provide training and technical assistance, in the areas of program quality, sustainability and networking for 21st CCLC grantee recipients and other afterschool providers throughout the state in an effort to build the capacity of staff, thereby increasing the quality of these programs.  Through this cooperative grant agreement, NJSACC has provided trainings and technical assistance that included: creating a welcoming environment and designing engaging activities for students and their families; understanding the National Afterschool Association’s (NAA) “Standards of Quality, and ensuring health and safety.  Additionally, NJSACC coordinated a statewide training, “Effective Management of an Out-of-School Time Program,” conducted by the National Institute of Out-of-School Time (NIOST).  Finally, NJSACC has conducted site visits to help agencies address monitoring findings to ensure continuous improvement and program quality.

Target Population:  21st CCLC grantees and other potential applicants.

Time Period:  October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009

Funding (Amount and Source):  $150,000 in federalNCLB, Title IV, Part B funds.

Supportive Resources

Other relevant resources:

New Jersey Afterschool Network

Description:  In April 2007, five New Jersey organizations: the New Jersey School-Age Care Coalition (NJSACC), New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE), New Jersey Department of Human Services (NJDHS), New Jersey Association of Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (NJACCRRA), New Jersey Department of Children and Families (DCF), and New Jersey After 3 (NJA3), believing in the need for a coordinated effort of afterschool funds, policy and school-community connections, applied for funding from the Charles S. Mott Foundation as the New Jersey Afterschool Network (NJAN).

The New Jersey Afterschool Network is designed to build lasting public support for quality afterschool programs across New Jersey. The focus of NJAN is on building public awareness and support; offering guidance for parents, providers and advocates; strengthening relationships with policymakers, funders, practitioners and parents; and sharing best practices in the field.  The NJSACC is serving as the coordinating and fiduciary agent of NJAN.

Target Population: All afterschool programs throughout New Jersey.

Time Period: October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009

Funding (Amount and Source): $31,000 in federalNCLB, Title IV, Part B funds.

Supportive Resources

Other relevant resources:

Drug Abuse Education Fund Project

Description:    As required under N.J.S.A. 2C:43-3.5 and N.J.S.A..54A:9-25.12 et seq., a Drug Abuse Education Fund was established from portions of taxpayer-designated refunds and penalties assessed against individuals adjudicated or convicted of certain crimes.  A portion of the resources accumulated in the fund are appropriated annually to the NJDOE for distribution to nongovernmental entities for the use of law enforcement personnel in providing drug abuse education to students in grades kindergarten through twelve on a statewide basis.  Under the appropriation for these statutory provisions, funds have been provided annually to D.A.R.E. New Jersey, Inc. for the provision of substance abuse education to students in New Jersey schools.

Target Population:  All public school students in grades K-12.

Time Period:   FY09

Funding (Amount and Source):  $375,000 in State Drug Abuse Education Funds.

Supportive Resources:   D.A.R.E. New Jersey, Inc. at http://www.darenj.com/.

Collaboration and Technical Support

Governor’s Strategy for Safe Streets and Neighborhoods

Description:    This strategy is a comprehensive approach for addressing the problems of gangs, youth violence and illegal guns; improving the delivery of the support and services that prevent children from becoming delinquent; targeting and intensifying law enforcement officials’ focus on perpetrators of gang and street-level violence; and keeping individuals released from prisons and detention centers from engaging in future criminal behavior. The strategy uses three pillars for promoting a safer New Jersey: enforcement, prevention, and reentry, with the foundation being effective prevention programs aimed at reducing the factors that place youth at risk for delinquency.

Under this strategy, state departments, their respective staff and the funds managed by them are engaged in support of the common goal of public safety. The NJDOE closely coordinates with the Attorney General’s office and other state agencies for the successful coordination and implementation of the strategy, including serving on the various work and advisory groups, such as the Prevention Coordinating Council, formed to coordinate state and local public safety efforts.

Three key initiatives being implemented to support the educational mission through these collaborative partnerships are described below:

  • New Jersey High School Graduation Campaign – This is a year-long effort, in partnership with the America’s Promise Alliance, intended to combat the high rate of high school dropouts. The campaign involves 500 partners from across New Jersey, representing schools, businesses, non-profit and faith-based organizations.
  • Truancy Reduction Pilot Project – This is a collaborative initiative among the NJDOE, Office of the Attorney General, Juvenile Justice Commission, Administrative Office of the Courts, Department of Children and Families, and Department of State designed to reduce truancy and increase student engagement in school within six New Jersey communities (Asbury Park, Camden, Newark, Paterson, Trenton, and Vineland) using the technical support and resources of the partner state agencies and the National Center for School Engagement. (For more information on this project, refer to the project description under the Prevention and Intervention Programs and Strategies section of this report.)
  • Municipal Planning – Led by the Office of the Attorney General (OAG), in collaboration with the OAG’s Prevention Coordinating Council, this initiative is designed to establish Municipal Planning Committees in six New Jersey communities (Asbury Park, Camden, Newark, Paterson, Trenton and Vineland). The purpose of the initiative is to determine whether the creation of a citywide prevention planning organizational structure can help community representatives coordinate their efforts to assess and address the risk and protective factors in their communities; identify the resources that are available and functioning in their cities; assess how the programs and services address the identified risk and protective factors; and determine how the programs and services fit into the broad safety net of prevention supports for children and families in their cities. The organizational structure is meant to strengthen the many initiatives currently under way and organize the efforts under a clear vision of prevention that can be readily shared with and understood by youth and families, facilitating their ability to access services.  The communities will be using the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s Communities That Care assessment process to guide their work. The Municipal Planning Committees will be provided with a staff person, training in the assessment process through a federally sponsored resource, and a small amount of funding to support activities conducted under the initiative.

Supportive Resources:

Collaboration with Law Enforcement 

Description: The NJDOE coordinates with the New Jersey Department of Law and Pubic Safety on matters related to safety and the illegal use or possession of substances and weapons through the Attorney General’s Education and Law Enforcement Working Group. As set forth in N.J.A.C. 6A:16-6, each school district is required to establish a memorandum of agreement (MOA) with local law enforcement authorities.  The MOA, which is reviewed and signed annually by local education and law enforcement officials, forms the basis for information sharing among education and law enforcement representatives and sets parameters for law enforcement investigations on school grounds.  The MOA must be consistent with the format and content established by the Attorney General and the Commissioner of Education in the Uniform State Memorandum of Agreement between Education and Law Enforcement Officials.

In November 2007, the Attorney General and the Commissioner of Education issued a revised MOA, which contains new information on school safety and security, including information on school security plans and training; gang threats, recruitment and information sharing; harassment, intimidation, and bullying; offenses involving computers; offenses involving hazing; reports of child abuse or neglect; law enforcement units; inquiries regarding law enforcement operations, stationhouse adjustments, and notification of arrests or charges filed against school personnel; notification of emergencies; and School Violence Awareness Week.

The NJDOE coordinates with the Office of the Attorney General on the Gang Awareness Initiative.  On October 12, 2007, Governor Jon S. Corzine signed into law N.J.S.C. 52:17B-4.7, which requires the Attorney General, in coordination with the Commissioner of Education, to develop seminars to teach school administrators to recognize signs of gang involvement or activity.  The law also requires that a seminar on gang awareness be held annually in each county for all public and nonpublic school administrators.  These training sessions are offered by each county prosecutor’s office in conjunction with the county office of education, and the training programs address gang awareness and related topics and are facilitated by trainers from various law enforcement agencies.

Additionally, the NJDOE collaborated with the Office of the Attorney General and the New Jersey State Police Cyber Crimes Unit on Governor Corzine’s Internet Safety Initiative.  In August 2007, the Attorney General and the Commissioner of Education announced a training program on Internet safety for school teachers and administrators.  The program was developed as a “train the trainer” model, preparing representatives from various agencies to deliver the training.  The training curriculum included information on cyberbullying, the potential dangers of social networking sites and gambling sites, the behavioral traits of sexual predators and the methods they use to lure potential victims. Seven regional trainings were provided in the 2007-2008 school year for over 1,000 educators.

Supportive Resources:

The current Uniform State Memorandum of Agreement between Education and Law Enforcement Officials can be found at http://www.state.nj.us/education/schools/security/regs/agree.doc.

Collaboration with the New Jersey School Security Task Force

Description: In October 2006, Governor Jon S. Corzine announced the creation of a School Security Task Force to evaluate security measures at New Jersey schools.  The NJDOE coordinates with the New Jersey School Security Task Force, which brings together state, county and local government officials, as well as members of the education and law enforcement communities, to address school safety and security matters.  Specifically, the members of the School Security Task Force include county prosecutors, county superintendents, school district superintendents, the New Jersey Education Association, the New Jersey Department of Children and Families, nonpublic school representatives, fire officials, State Police, Office of Emergency Management, and municipal law enforcement officials. The NJDOE also coordinates with the Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, which is responsible for chairing the School Security Task Force, to provide key technical assistance and guidance in response to policy development for school safety and security.

The School Security Task Force has made key recommendations regarding the preparedness of schools to manage critical incidents.  As a result of these recommendations, the Attorney General and the Commissioner of Education issued “parallel” directives to law enforcement and education officials respectively, which contained model procedures for responding to active shooter scenarios, school lockdowns, school evacuations, school bomb threats, as well as responding to public information requests regarding school safety and security incidents.  In October 2007, the NJDOE disseminated the educational directives, or model procedures, titled School Administrator Procedures: Responding to Critical Incidents. The NJDOE, in collaboration with the Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, also developed online training modules titled Critical Incident Response Procedures for School Administrators, Faculty and Staff. This training tool for educators focuses on the contents of the School Administrator Procedures publication and provides school districts with information to assist them in enhancing communication, cooperation and coordination with emergency responders, resulting in improved responses to threats and hazards. In June 2009, each school was provided with a training tool titled Critical Response Procedures, in CD format, to assist districts with the training of all school staff in responding to critical incidents in schools, in accordance with N.J.A.C. 6A:16-5.1(d).

Supportive Resources:                       

Collaboration with the New Jersey Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force

Description:The NJDOE coordinates with the New Jersey Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force, pursuant to P.L.2001, ch. 246, the Domestic Security Preparedness Act, which is chaired by the Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness and includes representatives from appropriate state agencies. The NJDOE has representation on the Domestic Security Preparedness Executive Planning Committee and the Domestic Security Preparedness Planning Group.

As a result of Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force planning, a committee was formed to specifically address the unique needs of schools for responding to potential attacks and threats.  The Infrastructure Advisory Committee - School Sector recommended the development of a publication titled School Safety and Security Manual: Best Practices Guidelines.  The second generation of the manual was disseminated to all chief school administrators as a secure document in January 2007. Additionally, key stakeholders continue to meet to develop the minimum requirements for school districts’ school safety and security plans.

Supportive Resources:

  • Both the School Safety and Security Manual: Best Practices Guidelines and the School Administrator Procedures: Responding to Critical Incidents publications are confidential and are not deemed to be public records under the provisions of N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1 et seq. or the common law concerning access to public records.  These documents are accessible to school administrators and school safety and security staff.  They can be found on a secure section of the School Security Web site at http://www.nj.gov/education/schools/security/safetycenter/.
  • Information on the New Jersey Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force can be found at: http://www.njhomelandsecurity.gov/.

Collaboration with Human Services Agencies and Student Support Staff

Description:    One of the conclusions drawn from widely publicized violent incidents in our society is that schools should examine how they collaborate with local mental health agencies and how they utilize existing student support services staff.  The effective use of student support services staff and the development of cooperative relationships between them and mental health providers are important components of schools' responses to violence.  Therefore, the NJDOE continues to forge links among New Jersey schools, mental health, and other human service and health providers to establish effective working relationships, identify areas of concern, and consider strategies for improving the delivery of student support services.

Specifically, NJDOE staff collaborates with the leadership of the Association of Student Assistance Professionals of New Jersey, the New Jersey Association of School Psychologists and the New Jersey School Counselors Association on comprehensive student support services issues.  Representatives of these organizations serve on advisory committees for NJDOE projects, including the Social Norms Project and the Developing Safe and Civil Schools:  A Collaborative Approach to Social-Emotional and Character Development initiative.

Supportive Resources:

Collaboration with Child Welfare Agencies

Description: In an effort to provide supportive services and resources that address the needs of the whole child, the NJDOE has increased its efforts to collaborate with child welfare agencies for the purpose of information-sharing, support and access to schools and policy development.  The NJDOE coordinates with the New Jersey Department of Children and Families (DCF) in a number of ways:

  • New Jersey Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect - The department remains a member in good standing on the Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect which consists of key stakeholders including state agencies, community representatives and child advocates.  NJDOE’s participation on this task force has facilitated increased information-sharing, collaboration and prevention planning on issues related to the welfare of children in New Jersey.

  • Department of Education and Department of Children and Families Workgroup - The NJDOE co-chairs the DOE/DCF Workgroup which was created to address the issues regarding educational barriers for children in out-of-home placement raised by the Child Welfare Citizens Review Panel (CWCRP) at the 2007 Roundtable. This workgroup, composed of a number of external stakeholders, including, but not limited to, representatives from the Association of Children of New Jersey (ACNJ), Court-Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), Legal Services, Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) and Office of the Child Advocate (OCA) has worked over the past two years to establish a standardized training program about reporting child abuse and neglectto increase and improve communication and collaboration between education and child welfare agencies to support the educational needs of children in out-of-home placements.  As a result, the workgroup has:
    • Developed training for reporting child abuse and neglect entitled: Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect: What School Personnel Need to Do.   The purpose of the training is to provide all school staff with the content necessary to ensure that local school districts consistently implement the requirements outlined at N.J.A.C. 6A:16-11, Reporting Potentially Missing or Abused Children and to foster collaboration with DCF or other external agency training to school staff on reporting abuse and neglect. The training was piloted and identified as a comprehensive training tool that would prove useful to districts in implementing the training requirements at N.J.A.C. 6A:16-11(a)8.  The NJDOE anticipates making the training protocols available to local school districts via the Web for use during the 2009-2010 school year.
    • Developed a Memorandum of Agreement between the Department of Education and the Department of Children and Families (MOA).  The MOA is designed to promote, develop and enhance collaboration between school, child protective, behavioral health and prevention systems and other interested systems and parties to improve the well-being of children in New Jersey.  The MOA achieves this objective by creating a framework for promoting interagency collaboration and communication that supports educational stability and continuity for children in out-of-home care by outlining specific activities of each partner agency as well as those of local school districts and DCF personnel.  A draft MOA is being reviewed by DOE and DCF. 

Supportive Resources: The DOE/DCF intends to make the training protocol available in the fall of 2009.

Other Collaborative Partnerships

Description:  The NJDOE aims to continue to collaborate with the following groups: New Jersey School Boards Association, New Jersey Association of School Administrators, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, New Jersey Education Association, New Jersey School Counselors Association, Association of Student Assistance Professionals of New Jersey, New Jersey Association of School Psychologists, New Jersey Association of School Social Workers, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), including the Violence Institute of New Jersey at UMDNJ and the County Traumatic Loss Coalitions for Youth administered by UMDNJ, the Departments of State, Health and Senior Services, Human Services, Children and Families and Law and Public Safety, including the Juvenile Justice Commission and the Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force and affiliated committees and work groups, the Administrative Office of the Courts, the Attorney General’s Office, including the Education and Law Enforcement Working Group, and other organizations, associations and agencies.
The NJDOE continues to be represented on the following organizations and their subgroups: Governor’s Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Governor’s Youth Suicide Prevention Advisory Council, Governor’s Advisory Council on Domestic Violence, Governor’s Advisory Council on Sexual Violence, New Jersey Association of County Youth Services Coordinators, Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Committee and School-based Probation Committee, New Jersey Coalition for Bullying Awareness and Prevention, Commission on Bullying in Schools, Childhood Drinking Coalition and Domestic Security Preparedness Task Force and intends to continue to support the various collaborative initiatives described above.

The NJDOE coordinates with the New Jersey Alliance for Social and Character Development (NJASECD) on information and resource-sharing and technical assistance to local school districts regarding social-emotional and character development.  The NJDOE has served as a collaborator in each of the two annual conferences held by the organization, and continues to serve as a resource to the NJASECD Advisory Board.

Supportive Resources:   Information on the New Jersey Alliance for Social and Character Development can be found at http://www.eirc.org/website/Programs-+and+-Services/NJASECD-Character-Ed.html



Appendix A: Public School Safety Law

AN ACT concerning violence in the public schools and amending P.L.1982, c.163.

C.18A:17-46 Reporting of act of violence by school employee; annual report; public hearing.

Any school employee observing or having direct knowledge from a participant or victim of an act of violence shall, in accordance with standards established by the commissioner, file a report describing the incident to the school principal in a manner prescribed by the commissioner, and copy of same shall be forwarded to the district superintendent.

The principal shall notify the district superintendent of schools of the action taken regarding the incident. Annually, at a public hearing, the superintendent of schools shall report to the board of education all acts of violence and vandalism which occurred during the previous school year. Verification of the annual report on violence and vandalism shall be part of the State's monitoring of the school district, and the State Board of Education shall adopt regulations that impose a penalty on a school employee who knowingly falsifies the report. A board of education shall provide ongoing staff training, in cooperation with the Department of Education, in fulfilling the reporting requirements pursuant to this section. The majority representative of the school employees shall have access monthly to the number and disposition of all reported acts of school violence and vandalism.

Approved February 15, 2007.

18A:17-47. Discharge of, or discrimination against, school employee who files report

It shall be unlawful for any board of education to discharge or in any manner discriminate against a school employee as to his employment because the employee had filed a report pursuant to section 1 of this act. Any employee discriminated against shall be restored to his employment and shall be compensated by the board of education for any loss of wages arising out of the discrimination; provided, however, if the employee shall cease to be qualified to perform the duties of his employment he shall not be entitled to restoration and compensation.

L.1982, c. 163, s. 2, eff. Oct. 28, 1982.

18A:17-48. Annual report to legislature

The Commissioner of Education shall each year submit a report to the Education Committees of the Senate and General Assembly detailing the extent of violence and vandalism in the public schools and making recommendations to alleviate the problem.

L.1982, c. 163, s. 3, eff. Oct. 28, 1982.


Appendix B:  Data Collection Form

Violence, Vandalism, and Substance Abuse (VV-SA) Incident Report Form

VV-SA Offender Information 2007-2008

VV-SA, Victim Information 2007-2008


Appendix C: Figures 1-20

Figure 1. Total Incidents for Major Reporting Categories

Figure 2. Frequency of Types of Violence, 2007-2008

Figure 3. Frequency of Types of Vandalism, 2007-2008

Figure 4. Frequency of Types of Weapons and Substance Abuse, 2007-2008

Figure 5. Trends in HIBT* Incidents

Figure 6. Count of Schools by range of HIBT* Incidents, 2006-07 & 2007-08

Figure 7. Summary of HIBT* Student Offenders by Grade Level, 2007-08

Figure 8.  Incidents by Location

Figure 9. Location of Violence and Weapon Incidents, 2007-08

Figure 10. Location of Vandalism Incidents, 2007-08

Figure 11. Types of Incidents Occurring in the Classroom

Figure 12. Types of Incidents of Violence Occurring in the Classroom

Figure 13. Gang Related Incidents by Major Category, 2007-08

Figure 14. Police Notification of Incidents, 2007 – 2008

Figure 15. Disciplinary Action Taken, 2007-08

Figure 16. Number of Suspensions by Duration, 2007-08

Figure 17. Program Provided as Part of Disciplinary Action Taken, 2007-08

Figure 18. Comparison of Offender Types, 2006-07 & 2007-08

Figure 19. Comparison of Victim Types, 2006-07 & 2007-08

Figure 20. Types of Incidents where Staff was Victim, 2007-08

* Harassment/Intimidation/Bullying/Threat


Figure 1. Total Incidents for Major Reporting Categories

Figure 2. Frequency of Types of Violence, 2007-2008

Figure 3. Frequency of Types of Vandalism, 2007-2008

Figure 4. Frequency of Types of Weapons and Substance Abuse, 2007-2008

Figure 5. Trends in HIBT* Incidents

Figure 6. Count of Schools by range of HIBT* Incidents, 2006-07 & 2007-08

Figure 7. Summary of HIBT* Student Offenders by Grade Level, 2007-08

Figure 8. Incidents by Location

Figure 9. Location of Violence and Weapon Incidents, 2007-08

Figure 10. Location of Vandalism Incidents, 2007-08

Figure 11. Types of Incidents Occurring in the Classroom

Figure 12. Types of Incidents of Violence Occurring in the Classroom

Figure 13. Gang Related Incidents by Major Category, 2007-08

Figure 14. Police Notification of Incidents, 2007 – 2008

Figure 15. Disciplinary Action Taken, 2007-08

Figure 16. Number of Suspensions by Duration, 2007-08

Figure 17. Program Provided as Part of Disciplinary Action Taken, 2007-08

Figure 18. Comparison of Offender Types, 2006-07 & 2007-08

Figure 19. Comparison of Victim Types, 2006-07 & 2007-08

Figure 20. Types of Incidents where Staff was Victim, 2007-08


Appendix D: District Totals by County

Types of Violence, Vandalism, Weapons Offenses, and Substance Abuse

Violence

Vandalism

Simple Assault
Aggravated Assault
Fight
Gang Fight
Robbery
Extortion
Sex Offense
Criminal Threat
Kidnapping
Harassment/Intimidation/Bullying/Threat

Arson
Bomb Threat or Fake Bomb
Burglary
Damage to Property
Fireworks Offense
Theft
Trespassing

Weapons

Substance Abuse

Firearm
Possession of, assault with, or sale/
  distribution of a handgun or rifle.

Bomb Offense (exploded/did not explode)

Other Weapon
Possession of, assault with, or sale/
 distribution of weapon other than a firearm

Use
Possession
Sale or Distribution

Total
Unduplicated count of incidents.  May not sum to the total of the four categories.

» Microsoft Excel

County  District Enrollment Violence  Vandalism Weapons Substances Total
ATLANTIC            
  ABSECON CITY 822 6 5 0 0 11
  ATLANTIC CITY 6,392 117 15 11 63 206
  ATLANTIC CO SPECIAL SERV 460 57 1 3 1 61
  ATLANTIC CO VOCATIONAL 615 5 1 0 2 8
  BRIGANTINE CITY 852 2 3 2 0 7
  BUENA REGIONAL 2,497 47 1 0 6 54
  chARTer~TECH HIGH SCHOOL 243 9 0 1 0 10
  EGG HARBOR CITY 502 4 0 3 1 8
  EGG HARBOR TWP 7,665 105 21 13 18 156
  ESTELL MANOR CITY 221 4 2 0 0 6
  FOLSOM BORO 416 2 0 0 0 2
  Galloway Community CS 296 6 0 0 0 6
  GALLOWAY TWP 3,683 10 1 5 5 21
  GREATER EGG HARBOR REG 3,877 59 16 6 23 103
  HAMILTON TWP 3,229 31 3 3 1 38
  HAMMONTON TOWN 3,285 13 2 3 0 18
  LINWOOD CITY 997 0 2 0 0 2
  MAINLAND REGIONAL 1,591 27 8 2 14 48
  MARGATE CITY 560 0 0 0 0 0
  MULLICA TWP 724 2 0 0 0 2
  NORTHFIELD CITY 1,071 19 2 0 0 21
  Oceanside CS 378 1 0 0 0 1
  PleasanTech Academy CS 607 5 0 0 0 5
  PLEASANTVILLE CITY 3,478 32 22 10 8 71
  PORT REPUBLIC CITY 108 0 0 0 1 1
  SOMERS POINT CITY 1,115 11 1 4 0 15
  VENTNOR CITY 943 0 0 2 0 2
  WEYMOUTH TWP 256 1 2 1 0 4
County Total 46,881 575 108 69 143 887
               
BERGEN            
  ALLENDALE BORO 992 1 3 0 0 4
  ALPINE BORO 134 0 0 0 0 0
  Bergen Arts and Sciences 298 0 0 0 0 0
  BERGEN CO SPECIAL SERVICE 1,081 0 0 0 0 0
  BERGEN COUNTY VOCATIONAL 2,056 22 2 8 8 39
  BERGENFIELD BORO 3,512 10 2 0 0 12
  BOGOTA BORO 1,246 16 5 2 0 22
  CARLSTADT BORO 568 7 1 0 0 8
  CARLSTADT-EAST RUTHERFORD 523 3 2 0 1 6
  CLIFFSIDE PARK BORO 2,588 9 1 1 0 10
  CLOSTER BORO 1,156 1 3 0 0 4
  CRESSKILL BORO 1,689 2 4 0 2 8
  DEMAREST BORO 663 7 7 0 0 14
  DUMONT BORO 2,817 10 3 0 26 38
  EAST RUTHERFORD BORO 682 3 0 0 0 3
  EDGEWATER BORO 443 6 0 3 0 9
  ELMWOOD PARK 2,234 26 10 0 3 39
  EMERSON BORO 1,197 5 3 0 0 8
  ENGLEWOOD CITY 2,699 71 21 6 5 98
  ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS BORO 436 3 0 0 0 3
  Englewood on the Palisade 181 5 0 0 0 5
  FAIR LAWN BORO 4,772 20 4 3 1 26
  FAIRVIEW BORO 1,057 12 0 0 0 12
  FORT LEE BORO 3,472 37 54 2 4 97
  FRANKLIN LAKES BORO 1,471 1 0 0 0 1
  GARFIELD CITY 4,492 13 15 3 1 32
  GLEN ROCK BORO 2,479 2 2 0 0 4
  HACKENSACK CITY 4,879 0 3 5 5 13
  HARRINGTON PARK BORO 738 0 0 0 0 0
  HASBROUCK HEIGHTS BORO 1,561 17 7 0 2 25
  HAWORTH BORO 514 0 0 0 0 0
  HILLSDALE BORO 1,439 19 2 2 0 23
  HO HO KUS BORO 660 0 0 0 0 0
  LEONIA BORO 1,724 9 5 1 4 19
  LITTLE FERRY BORO 958 0 0 0 0 0
  LODI BOROUGH 3,127 10 3 0 3 16
  LYNDHURST TWP 2,224 14 0 0 2 16
  MAHWAH TWP 3,442 32 52 0 4 88
  MAYWOOD BORO 870 1 2 0 0 3
  MIDLAND PARK BORO 1,134 0 6 0 0 6
  MONTVALE BORO 1,002 0 2 0 0 2
  MOONACHIE BORO 268 7 1 1 0 9
  NEW MILFORD BORO 2,021 20 8 0 8 36
  NORTH ARLINGTON BORO 1,598 24 1 0 3 28
  NORTHERN HIGHLANDS REG 1,274 3 0 0 6 9
  NORTHERN VALLEY REGIONAL 2,526 14 6 0 23 42
  NORTHVALE BORO 591 3 0 0 0 3
  NORWOOD BORO 626 3 0 1 0 4
  OAKLAND BORO 1,676 1 11 0 0 12
  OLD TAPPAN BORO 872 0 0 0 0 0
  ORADELL BORO 794 2 0 0 0 2
  PALISADES PARK 1,439 26 1 2 1 30
  PARAMUS BORO 4,328 31 11 5 10 57
  PARK RIDGE BORO 1,370 3 6 1 0 10
  PASCACK VALLEY REGIONAL 1,900 3 2 2 10 17
  RAMAPO-INDIAN HILL REG 2,327 31 5 3 12 50
  RAMSEY BORO 3,132 6 9 2 20 36
  RIDGEFIELD BORO 2,004 20 0 0 7 27
  RIDGEFIELD PARK TWP 2,085 2 0 0 3 5
  RIDGEWOOD VILLAGE 5,588 18 11 2 12 42
  RIVER DELL REGIONAL 1,526 0 7 1 2 10
  RIVER EDGE BORO 1,126 0 0 0 0 0
  RIVER VALE TWP 1,391 5 7 2 0 14
  ROCHELLE PARK TWP 499 3 1 0 0 4
  RUTHERFORD BORO 2,447 8 3 1 2 14
  SADDLE BROOK TWP 1,756 9 12 0 3 24
  SADDLE RIVER BORO 230 0 0 0 0 0
  SOUTH BERGEN JOINTURE COM 337 1 0 0 0 1
  SOUTH HACKENSACK TWP 221 0 0 0 0 0
  Teaneck Community CS 267 1 0 0 0 1
  TEANECK TWP 3,988 30 11 5 10 52
  TENAFLY BORO 3,463 12 3 0 4 19
  UPPER SADDLE RIVER BORO 1,377 1 1 0 0 2
  WALDWICK BORO 1,584 7 1 0 6 14
  WALLINGTON BORO 1,152 0 1 2 3 6
  WESTWOOD REGIONAL 2,617 6 3 0 3 12
  WOODCLIFF LAKE BORO 830 1 1 0 0 2
  WOOD-RIDGE BORO 1,150 6 6 0 1 13
  WYCKOFF TWP 2,355 27 5 1 0 32
County Total 133,935 728 358 67 220 1,352
               
BURLINGTON            
  BASS RIVER TWP 115 0 0 1 0 1
  BEVERLY CITY 217 1 2 1 0 4
  BORDENTOWN REGIONAL 2,351 31 2 0 2 35
  BURLINGTON CITY 1,806 129 12 4 4 149
  BURLINGTON CO SPEC SERV 992 28 4 9 22 61
  BURLINGTON CO VOCATIONAL 2,138 54 7 4 3 66
  BURLINGTON TWP 4,164 34 5 7 7 52
  CHESTERFIELD TWP 395 8 0 0 0 8
  CINNAMINSON TWP 2,469 50 17 2 9 75
  DELANCO TWP 388 8 4 0 0 12
  DELRAN TWP 2,850 17 8 1 3 29
  EASTAMPTON TWP 743 1 0 0 0 1
  EDGEWATER PARK TWP 827 7 0 1 0 8
  EVESHAM TWP 4,919 11 7 3 1 22
  FLORENCE TWP 1,611 21 7 1 9 38
  HAINESPORT TWP 658 1 0 1 1 3
  LENAPE REGIONAL 7,474 50 7 4 32 93
  LUMBERTON TWP 1,727 12 3 0 0 15
  MANSFIELD TWP 695 5 0 1 0 5
  MAPLE SHADE TWP 2,048 6 2 0 10 18
  MEDFORD LAKES BORO 538 0 6 0 0 6
  MEDFORD TWP 3,059 7 0 0 0 7
  MOORESTOWN TWP 4,399 8 3 2 6 18
  MOUNT HOLLY TWP 986 2 1 2 0 3
  MOUNT LAUREL TWP 4,387 7 1 0 0 8
  NEW HANOVER TWP 154 3 2 0 0 5
  NORTH HANOVER TWP 1,157 2 1 0 0 3
  NORTHERN BURLINGTON REG 1,821 48 17 2 9 76
  PALMYRA BORO 990 19 2 1 3 25
  PEMBERTON TWP 5,008 43 7 3 3 56
  RANCOCAS VALLEY REGIONAL 2,341 18 1 4 19 42
  RIVERSIDE TWP 1,435 1 4 2 0 7
  RIVERTON 254 0 3 0 0 3
  SHAMONG TWP 934 1 2 1 0 4
  SOUTHAMPTON TWP 796 4 0 2 1 7
  SPRINGFIELD TWP 305 1 0 0 0 1
  TABERNACLE TWP 878 6 0 0 0 6
  WASHINGTON TWP 69 0 0 0 1 1
  WESTAMPTON 930 17 0 0 0 17
  WILLINGBORO TWP 4,674 110 19 7 7 141
  WOODLAND TWP 159 0 0 0 0 0
County Total 73,860 771 156 66 152 1,131
               
CAMDEN            
  AUDUBON BORO 1,523 21 1 0 0 22
  BARRINGTON BORO 571 13 1 1 0 15
  BELLMAWR BORO 1,051 1 2 1 0 4
  BERLIN BORO 837 8 1 0 0 9
  BERLIN TWP 590 5 0 0 0 5
  BLACK HORSE PIKE REGIONAL 4,275 73 19 4 44 140
  BROOKLAWN BORO 315 2 0 0 0 2
  Camden Academy Charter HS 401 0 0 0 0 0
  CAMDEN CITY 13,105 90 33 13 6 140
  CAMDEN CO ED SERV COMM 6 2 1 0 0 3
  CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONAL 1,868 89 16 8 10 122
  Camden's Promise CS 407 0 0 0 0 0
  CHERRY HILL TWP 11,544 40 19 5 43 107
  CHESILHURST 104 0 0 0 0 0
  CLEMENTON BORO 519 8 2 0 0 10
  COLLINGSWOOD BORO 1,917 6 0 2 10 17
  D.U.E. Season CS 471 0 0 0 0 0
  EASTERN CAMDEN COUNTY REG 2,126 25 4 3 29 61
  Environment Community CS 241 0 0 0 0 0
  Freedom Academy CS 257 3 0 1 0 4
  GIBBSBORO BORO 259 0 0 0 0 0
  GLOUCESTER CITY 2,125 30 1 1 14 46
  GLOUCESTER TWP 7,619 59 0 8 1 68
  HADDON HEIGHTS BORO 1,310 38 5 2 5 49
  HADDON TWP 2,144 8 7 1 4 20
  HADDONFIELD BORO 2,388 10 2 2 13 27
  LAUREL SPRINGS BORO 162 0 0 0 0 0
  LAWNSIDE BORO 297 11 0 0 0 11
  LEAP Academy University C 768 4 2 4 0 10
  LINDENWOLD BORO 2,264 16 11 5 2 29
  MAGNOLIA BORO 460 11 0 0 0 11
  MERCHANTVILLE BORO 355 14 0 0 0 14
  MOUNT EPHRAIM BORO 447 0 0 0 0 0
  OAKLYN BORO 450 2 3 0 0 5
  PENNSAUKEN TWP 5,568 31 19 10 11 67
  PINE HILL BORO 2,182 36 10 6 14 65
  RUNNEMEDE BORO 789 0 0 0 0 0
  SOMERDALE BORO 476 5 1 3 0 9
  STERLING HIGH SCHOOL DIST 1,047 21 6 0 14 41
  STRATFORD BORO 828 1 6 0 0 7
  VOORHEES TWP 3,321 2 4 2 1 8
  WATERFORD TWP 913 27 1 1 0 28
  WINSLOW TWP 6,063 40 11 5 6 61
  WOODLYNNE BORO 459 5 0 1 0 6
County Total 84,820 757 188 89 227 1,243
               
CAPE MAY            
  AVALON BORO 77 0 0 0 0 0
  CAPE MAY CITY 154 0 0 0 0 0
  CAPE MAY CO SPECIAL SERV 327 7 8 3 10 28
  CAPE MAY CO VOCATIONAL 590 8 2 0 3 13
  DENNIS TWP 697 1 0 0 0 1
  LOWER CAPE MAY REGIONAL 1,740 33 4 0 16 51
  LOWER TWP 1,837 0 0 0 0 0
  MIDDLE TWP 2,894 31 2 4 9 46
  NORTH WILDWOOD CITY 308 6 2 1 0 9
  OCEAN CITY 2,048 58 1 1 13 72
  SEA ISLE CITY 80 0 0 0 0 0
  STONE HARBOR BORO 84 0 0 0 0 0
  UPPER TWP 1,568 1 8 1 0 10
  WEST CAPE MAY BORO 52 0 0 0 0 0
  WILDWOOD CITY 879 17 8 0 23 48
  WILDWOOD CREST BORO 278 0 0 0 0 0
  WOODBINE BORO 211 4 1 0 0 5
County Total 13,822 166 36 10 74 283
               
CUMBERLAND            
  BRIDGETON CITY 4,708 33 3 9 2 44
  COMMERCIAL TWP 671 0 0 1 0 1
  CUMBERLAND CO VOCATIONAL 277 12 12 1 1 26
  CUMBERLAND REGIONAL 1,326 48 5 10 20 81
  DEERFIELD TWP 352 8 0 0 0 8
  DOWNE TWP 169 0 1 0 0 1
  FAIRFIELD TWP 609 8 0 5 0 13
  GREENWICH TWP 82 0 0 0 0 0
  HOPEWELL TWP 572 6 2 0 0 8
  LAWRENCE TWP 452 17 0 0 2 19
  MAURICE RIVER TWP 393 3 0 1 1 5
  MILLVILLE CITY 6,267 97 11 15 6 128
  STOW CREEK TWP 138 4 0 0 0 4
  UPPER DEERFIELD TWP 896 1 0 0 0 1
  VINELAND CITY 9,768 114 21 24 17 175
County Total 26,679 351 55 66 49 514
               
ESSEX            
  Adelaide L. Sandford CS 144 0 0 0 0 0
  BELLEVILLE TOWN 4,435 56 14 7 3 80
  BLOOMFIELD TWP 5,950 28 3 2 3 36
  CALDWELL-WEST CALDWELL 2,630 11 5 2 0 17
  CEDAR GROVE TWP 1,581 17 8 0 0 25
  CITY OF ORANGE TWP 4,569 18 6 5 4 33
  Discovery CS 75 0 0 0 0 0
  EAST ORANGE 9,892 54 21 9 5 85
  East Orange Community CS 495 0 0 0 0 0
  ESSEX CO ED SERV COMM 149 18 6 2 2 27
  ESSEX CO VOC-TECH 2,121 24 16 4 2 46
  ESSEX FELLS BORO 250 0 1 0 0 1
  FAIRFIELD TWP 729 0 0 0 0 0
  GLEN RIDGE BORO 1,876 1 2 0 2 5
  Gray CS 308 0 0 0 0 0
  Greater Newark CS 191 0 0 0 0 0
  IRVINGTON TOWNSHIP 7,276 128 19 5 4 155
  Lady Liberty Academy CS 424 9 2 0 0 11
  LIVINGSTON TWP 5,579 20 13 3 7 41
  Maria L. Varisco-Rogers C 137 0 0 0 0 0
  Marion P. Thomas CS 393 60 15 0 0 72
  MILLBURN TWP 4,664 13 12 0 8 33
  MONTCLAIR TOWN 6,562 18 5 6 1 29
  New Horizons Comm. CS 469 0 2 0 0 2
  NEWARK CITY 40,507 109 60 23 12 201
  NORTH CALDWELL BORO 634 5 1 0 0 6
  North Star Acad. CS of Ne 597 0 0 0 0 0
  NUTLEY TOWN 4,033 5 6 0 0 11
  Robert Treat Academy CS 450 0 0 0 0 0
  ROSELAND BORO 485 0 0 0 0 0
  SOUTH ORANGE-MAPLEWOOD 6,085 85 21 6 9 120
  TEAM Academy Charter Scho 621 0 0 0 0 0
  University Heights CS 240 0 0 0 0 0
  VERONA BORO 2,034 14 5 0 2 21
  WEST ESSEX REGIONAL 1,573 22 20 0 3 44
  WEST ORANGE TOWN 6,359 31 1 6 10 46
County Total 124,512 746 264 80 77 1,147
               
GLOUCESTER            
  CLAYTON BORO 1,307 70 2 0 6 78
  CLEARVIEW REGIONAL 2,405 34 2 0 30 66
  DELSEA REGIONAL H.S DIST. 1,783 21 16 1 12 50
  DEPTFORD TWP 4,341 39 4 3 10 55
  EAST GREENWICH TWP 806 0 0 0 0 0
  ELK TWP 373 3 0 0 0 3
  FRANKLIN TWP 1,480 5 0 1 0 6
  GATEWAY REGIONAL 971 34 9 0 8 50
  GLASSBORO 2,347 21 14 4 5 43
  GLOUCESTER CO SPEC SERV 677 0 0 1 2 2
  GLOUCESTER CO VOCATIONAL 889 1 0 1 0 2
  GREENWICH TWP 535 1 2 0 0 3
  HARRISON TWP 1,510 0 0 1 0 1
  KINGSWAY REGIONAL 2,046 40 11 1 20 72
  LOGAN TWP 873 4 2 0 0 6
  MANTUA TWP 1,540 1 7 0 0 8
  MONROE TWP 6,039 34 18 11 9 71
  NATIONAL PARK BORO 302 3 0 0 0 3
  PAULSBORO BORO 1,400 0 8 0 0 8
  PITMAN BORO 1,605 13 0 0 3 16
  SOUTH HARRISON TWP 328 1 0 0 0 1
  SWEDESBORO-WOOLWICH 1,519 0 0 0 0 0
  WASHINGTON TWP 8,932 87 9 12 29 134
  WENONAH BORO 247 0 0 0 0 0
  WEST DEPTFORD TWP 3,266 68 14 4 11 97
  WESTVILLE BORO 353 1 1 0 0 2
  WOODBURY CITY 1,599 33 5 4 0 41
  WOODBURY HEIGHTS BORO 224 2 0 0 0 2
County Total 49,694 516 124 44 145 820
               
HUDSON            
  BAYONNE CITY 8,810 13 21 1 1 35
  C.R.E.A.T.E. CS 390 0 0 1 1 2
  EAST NEWARK BORO 225 16 3 0 0 19
  Elysian CS of Hoboken 262 0 0 0 0 0
  GUTTENBERG TOWN 956 6 1 1 0 7
  HARRISON TOWN 1,820 11 1 1 6 18
  HOBOKEN CITY 2,294 62 9 2 14 86
  Hoboken CS 271 0 0 0 0 0
  HUDSON COUNTY VOCATIONAL 1,341 0 0 0 0 0
  JERSEY CITY 28,119 129 9 63 76 268
  Jersey City Comm. CS 570 80 0 0 0 80
  Jersey City Golden Door 502 6 0 0 0 6
  KEARNY TOWN 5,615 45 9 2 13 69
  Learning Community CS 323 5 0 0 0 5
  Liberty Academy CS 283 39 2 4 0 45
  NORTH BERGEN TWP 7,465 24 11 4 8 47
  Schomburg CS 298 37 2 1 0 39
  SECAUCUS TOWN 2,077 14 2 2 5 21
  Soaring Heights CS 206 0 0 0 0 0
  UNION CITY 9,730 144 19 6 23 191
  University Academy CS 415 7 1 0 1 9
  WEEHAWKEN TWP 1,164 0 0 0 0 0
  WEST NEW YORK TOWN 7,054 22 11 1 12 44
County Total 80,189 660 101 89 160 991
               
HUNTERDON            
  ALEXANDRIA TWP 628 7 0 0 0 7
  BETHLEHEM TWP 601 5 1 1 0 7
  BLOOMSBURY BORO 146 0 0 0 0 0
  CALIFON BORO 143 0 0 0 0 0
  CLINTON TOWN 538 0 0 0 0 0
  CLINTON TWP 1,774 5 2 1 0 7
  DELAWARE TWP 479 4 2 0 0 6
  DELAWARE VALLEY REGIONAL 977 5 9 0 3 17
  EAST AMWELL TWP 488 7 0 0 0 7
  FLEMINGTON-RARITAN REG 3,558 15 5 2 0 22
  FRANKLIN TWP 345 5 1 0 0 6
  FRENCHTOWN BORO 146 0 0 0 0 0
  HAMPTON BORO 171 0 0 0 0 0
  HIGH BRIDGE BORO 405 5 2 0 0 7
  HOLLAND TWP 681 1 0 0 0 1
  HUNTERDON CENTRAL REG 3,002 16 9 2 22 49
  HUNTERDON CO ED SER COMM 102 12 1 2 8 22
  HUNTERDON CO VOCATIONAL 197 5 2 0 0 7
  KINGWOOD TWP 463 0 0 0 0 0
  LAMBERTVILLE CITY 151 0 0 0 0 0
  LEBANON BORO 80 0 0 0 0 0
  LEBANON TWP 833 9 0 0 0 9
  MILFORD BORO 114 0 0 0 0 0
  N HUNT/VOORHEES REGIONAL 2,957 35 11 2 11 58
  READINGTON TWP 2,187 16 1 0 2 19
  SOUTH HUNTERDON REGIONAL 345 18 1 0 3 22
  STOCKTON BORO 36 2 0 0 0 2
  TEWKSBURY TWP 775 5 0 1 0 6
  UNION TWP 605 10 0 1 0 11
  WEST AMWELL TWP 262 0 0 0 0 0
County Total 23,188 187 47 12 49 292
               
MERCER            
  EAST WINDSOR REGIONAL 4,947 102 15 7 19 140
  Emily Fisher CS of Adv. S 360 10 1 2 2 15
  EWING TWP 3,776 54 8 9 19 89
  Foundation Academy CS 87 0 0 0 0 0
  HAMILTON TWP 13,015 9 14 1 54 78
  HOPEWELL VALLEY REGIONAL 3,984 31 10 3 16 60
  International CS of Trent 90 0 0 0 0 0
  LAWRENCE TWP 3,928 95 6 4 5 108
  MERCER CO SPECIAL SERVICE 738 20 0 0 1 21
  MERCER COUNTY VOCATIONAL 450 2 3 0 2 7
  Pace CS of Hamilton 110 0 0 0 0 0
  Princeton CS 295 0 0 0 0 0
  PRINCETON REGIONAL 3,326 17 18 3 11 48
  ROBBINSVILLE 2,603 17 2 2 3 23
  TRENTON CITY 11,447 252 37 44 7 330
  Trenton Community CS 618 69 3 4 1 76
  Village CS 359 6 0 1 0 7
  W WINDSOR-PLAINSBORO REG 9,669 16 11 6 14 46
County Total 59,801 700 128 86 154 1,048
               
MIDDLESEX            
  CARTERET BORO 3,901 35 12 1 1 49
  Central Jersey College Pr 221 27 4 1 2 34
  CRANBURY TWP 632 2 0 0 1 3
  DUNELLEN BORO 1,098 22 2 2 0 26
  EAST BRUNSWICK TWP 8,837 45 18 5 11 77
  EDISON TWP 13,920 209 43 14 11 276
  Greater Brunswick CS 255 0 2 1 0 3
  HIGHLAND PARK BORO 1,530 4 58 5 3 70
  JAMESBURG BORO 630 33 0 1 0 34
  METUCHEN BORO 2,031 6 1 4 1 12
  MIDDLESEX BORO 2,049 5 2 0 0 7
  MIDDLESEX CO VOCATIONAL 1,899 8 5 2 2 16
  MIDDLESEX REG ED SER COMM 635 17 2 0 6 25
  MILLTOWN BORO 679 11 0 0 0 11
  MONROE TWP 5,125 17 5 0 12 34
  NEW BRUNSWICK CITY 6,707 186 9 5 3 201
  NORTH BRUNSWICK TWP 5,526 42 6 9 2 57
  OLD BRIDGE TWP 9,648 45 13 2 7 67
  PERTH AMBOY CITY 9,462 31 7 8 10 54
  PISCATAWAY TWP 6,979 14 8 0 12 34
  SAYREVILLE BORO 5,772 60 15 7 11 93
  SOUTH AMBOY CITY 1,118 21 2 0 4 27
  SOUTH BRUNSWICK TWP 8,822 32 5 2 14 52
  SOUTH PLAINFIELD BORO 3,710 15 18 1 3 37
  SOUTH RIVER BORO 2,203 21 6 3 4 34
  SPOTSWOOD BORO 1,763 14 2 0 5 21
  WOODBRIDGE TWP 13,359 79 19 9 32 138
County Total 118,505 1,001 264 82 157 1,492
               
MONMOUTH            
  Academy Charter High Scho 195 9 1 1 1 12
  ASBURY PARK CITY 2,176 21 3 7 6 37
  ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS BORO 293 1 1 0 0 2
  AVON BORO 144 1 0 0 0 1
  BAYSHORE JOINTURE COMM 49 0 0 0 0 0
  BELMAR BORO 521 3 1 0 0 4
  BRADLEY BEACH BORO 264 5 0 0 0 5
  BRIELLE BORO 712 2 0 0 0 2
  COLTS NECK TWP 1,370 3 2 0 0 5
  DEAL BORO 108 0 0 0 0 0
  EATONTOWN BORO 1,134 17 1 5 3 24
  FAIR HAVEN BORO 1,009 2 4 0 0 6
  FARMINGDALE BORO 143 9 0 0 0 9
  FREEHOLD BORO 1,348 9 1 3 0 12
  FREEHOLD REGIONAL 11,703 96 36 14 105 247
  FREEHOLD TWP 4,607 1 5 1 0 7
  HAZLET TWP 3,322 32 41 3 6 82
  HENRY HUDSON REGIONAL 444 5 0 1 0 6
  HIGHLANDS BORO 179 3 0 0 0 3
  HOLMDEL TWP 3,385 6 4 0 4 14
  Hope Academy CS 133 38 0 0 0 38
  HOWELL TWP 7,059 16 7 3 0 22
  KEANSBURG BORO 1,854 54 6 5 3 68
  KEYPORT BORO 1,178 5 2 2 5 13
  LITTLE SILVER BORO 809 0 3 0 0 3
  LONG BRANCH CITY 4,825 4 3 1 7 15
  MANALAPAN-ENGLISHTOWN REG 5,482 10 1 1 1 13
  MANASQUAN BORO 1,694 9 2 2 8 21
  MARLBORO TWP 6,072 2 0 0 0 2
  MATAWAN-ABERDEEN REGIONAL 3,750 26 6 7 3 41
  MIDDLETOWN TWP 10,142 187 29 5 96 315
  MILLSTONE TWP 1,653 10 4 1 0 15
  MONMOUTH BEACH BORO 322 1 0 0 0 1
  MONMOUTH CO VOCATIONAL 2,080 23 9 7 4 40
  MONMOUTH REGIONAL 1,141 13 3 2 3 21
  MONMOUTH-OCEAN ED SER COM 90 14 0 2 5 20
  NEPTUNE CITY 387 3 2 0 0 5
  NEPTUNE TWP 4,432 18 1 3 6 28
  OCEAN TWP 4,232 14 6 3 0 23
  OCEANPORT BORO 719 2 0 0 0 2
  RED BANK BORO 842 6 2 0 0 8
  RED BANK REGIONAL 1,116 12 4 0 12 28
  ROOSEVELT BORO 90 0 0 0 0 0
  RUMSON BORO 976 0 2 0 0 2
  RUMSON-FAIR HAVEN REG 991 11 1 0 7 19
  SEA GIRT BORO 164 0 0 0 0 0
  SHORE REGIONAL 720 11 1 0 8 19
  SHREWSBURY BORO 499 0 0 0 0 0
  SPRING LAKE BORO 254 0 0 1 0 1
  SPRING LAKE HEIGHTS BORO 335 9 3 0 0 10
  The Red Bank CS 159 0 0 1 0 1
  TINTON FALLS 1,583 17 5 0 0 22
  UNION BEACH 800 12 0 0 0 12
  UPPER FREEHOLD REGIONAL 2,292 20 6 0 4 30
  WALL TWP 4,269 47 10 2 9 68
  WEST LONG BRANCH BORO 666 4 2 0 0 6
County Total 106,911 823 220 83 306 1,410
               
MORRIS            
  BOONTON TOWN 1,247 12 4 2 3 20
  BOONTON TWP 521 4 0 0 0 4
  BUTLER BORO 1,220 23 1 1 1 26
  CHESTER TWP 1,429 3 0 2 0 5
  DENVILLE TWP 1,980 23 6 1 0 30
  DOVER TOWN 2,924 13 2 5 5 24
  EAST HANOVER TWP 1,127 7 0 0 0 7
  EDUC SERV COMM MORRIS CO 145 0 0 0 0 0
  FLORHAM PARK BORO 1,025 2 1 0 0 3
  HANOVER PARK REGIONAL 1,500 10 4 0 5 18
  HANOVER TWP 1,575 3 3 0 0 6
  HARDING TOWNSHIP 321 9 1 0 0 10
  JEFFERSON TWP 3,614 47 14 1 9 71
  KINNELON BORO 2,198 17 1 0 6 24
  LINCOLN PARK BORO 914 7 4 3 3 15
  LONG HILL TWP 1,063 12 1 0 0 12
  MADISON BORO 2,246 7 1 0 6 14
  MENDHAM BORO 668 3 0 0 0 3
  MENDHAM TWP 910 4 0 0 0 4
  MINE HILL TWP 364 1 0 1 0 2
  MONTVILLE TWP 4,255 18 41 0 9 68
  MORRIS COUNTY VOCATIONAL 635 4 3 0 4 11
  MORRIS HILLS REGIONAL 2,709 10 1 3 13 26
  MORRIS PLAINS BORO 614 0 0 0 0 0
  MORRIS SCHOOL DISTRICT 4,672 26 15 4 23 68
  MOUNT ARLINGTON BORO 390 4 0 0 0 4
  MOUNT OLIVE TWP 4,904 26 4 2 13 44
  MOUNTAIN LAKES BORO 1,606 3 9 0 2 14
  NETCONG BORO 296 5 0 1 0 6
  PARSIPPANY-TROY HILLS TWP 7,210 56 23 3 10 89
  PEQUANNOCK TWP 2,437 44 5 0 5 54
  RANDOLPH TWP 5,570 16 2 0 13 31
  RIVERDALE BORO 282 7 5 0 1 13
  ROCKAWAY BORO 640 11 1 0 0 12
  ROCKAWAY TWP 2,744 11 1 0 0 12
  ROXBURY TWP 4,415 55 1 0 13 69
  SCH DIST OF THE CHATHAMS 3,582 8 0 1 3 12
  Unity CS 98 0 0 0 0 0
  WASHINGTON TWP 2,863 30 3 1 0 34
  WEST MORRIS REGIONAL 2,621 8 7 1 6 21
  WHARTON BORO 791 2 0 1 0 3
County Total 80,322 551 164 33 153 889
               
OCEAN            
  BARNEGAT TWP 3,272 10 0 0 2 12
  BAY HEAD BORO 92 3 0 0 0 3
  BEACH HAVEN BORO 69 0 0 0 0 0
  BERKELEY TWP 1,960 0 0 0 0 0
  BRICK TWP 10,483 157 7 10 23 194
  CENTRAL REGIONAL 2,073 24 2 2 15 43
  EAGLESWOOD TWP 142 1 0 0 0 1
  ISLAND HEIGHTS BORO 110 0 2 2 0 2
  JACKSON TWP 9,736 42 25 5 29 101
  LACEY TWP 4,897 32 8 1 6 47
  LAKEHURST BORO 446 5 0 0 0 5
  LAKEWOOD TWP 5,459 41 16 10 7 71
  LAVALLETTE BORO 148 0 0 0 0 0
  LITTLE EGG HARBOR TWP 1,675 8 0 0 0 8
  LONG BEACH ISLAND 258 0 0 0 0 0
  MANCHESTER TWP 3,352 47 10 3 3 63
  OCEAN COUNTY VOCATIONAL 1,140 6 1 2 0 9
  OCEAN GATE BORO 142 0 2 0 0 2
  OCEAN TWP 543 1 2 0 0 3
  PINELANDS REGIONAL 1,820 51 14 2 21 87
  PLUMSTED TWP 1,830 16 1 2 1 20
  POINT PLEASANT BEACH BORO 836 9 1 0 4 14
  POINT PLEASANT BORO 3,158 20 7 2 21 50
  SEASIDE HEIGHTS BORO 207 1 0 0 0 1
  SEASIDE PARK BORO 78 0 0 0 0 0
  SOUTHERN REGIONAL 3,038 6 0 0 0 6
  STAFFORD TWP 2,459 0 3 0 0 3
  TOMS RIVER REGIONAL 17,259 96 21 8 78 203
  TUCKERTON BORO 287 0 0 0 0 0
County Total 76,966 576 122 49 210 948
               
PASSAIC            
  BLOOMINGDALE BORO 630 20 3 0 0 23
  Classical Academy CS of C 102 0 0 0 0 0
  CLIFTON CITY 10,524 10 8 1 25 43
  HALEDON BORO 1,013 1 0 0 0 1
  HAWTHORNE BORO 2,423 4 1 4 14 23
  LAKELAND REGIONAL 1,169 19 2 1 12 34
  LITTLE FALLS TWP 878 0 2 0 0 2
  NORTH HALEDON BORO 687 3 0 0 0 3
  PASSAIC CITY 12,398 94 30 19 29 167
  PASSAIC CO ED SERV COMM 90 2 1 0 0 3
  PASSAIC CO MANCHESTER REG 775 25 6 0 0 31
  PASSAIC COUNTY VOCATIONAL 2,802 66 14 5 2 85
  PASSAIC VALLEY REGIONAL 1,304 9 10 0 12 31
  PATERSON CITY 24,087 121 53 26 52 243
  Paterson CS for Sci/Tech 523 0 0 0 0 0
  POMPTON LAKES BORO 1,812 14 6 0 5 24
  PROSPECT PARK BORO 837 9 1 0 0 10
  RINGWOOD BORO 1,378 13 5 0 0 18
  TOTOWA BORO 982 3 0 0 0 3
  WANAQUE BORO 972 4 1 1 0 6
  WAYNE TWP 8,778 72 15 3 4 93
  WEST MILFORD TWP 4,309 32 29 1 7 63
  WEST PATERSON BORO 1,013 0 0 0 0 0
County Total 79,484 521 187 61 162 906
               
SALEM            
  ALLOWAY TWP 476 1 3 0 0 4
  ELMER BORO 76 0 0 0 0 0
  ELSINBORO TWP 103 0 0 0 0 0
  LOWER ALLOWAYS CREEK 231 1 0 0 0 1
  MANNINGTON TWP 171 0 1 0 0 1
  OLDMANS TWP 213 1 1 0 0 2
  PENNS GRV-CARNEY'S PT REG 2,455 21 1 1 2 25
  PENNSVILLE 2,050 7 4 0 6 17
  PITTSGROVE TWP 1,876 8 5 0 9 22
  QUINTON TWP 343 4 0 2 0 6
  SALEM CITY 1,425 38 3 8 1 50
  SALEM CO SPECIAL SERVICE 83 9 1 0 1 11
  SALEM COUNTY VOCATIONAL 613 13 0 0 0 13
  UPPER PITTSGROVE TWP 376 4 1 0 0 5
  WOODSTOWN-PILESGROVE REG 1,647 26 1 1 6 34
County Total 12,137 133 21 12 25 191
               
SOMERSET            
  BEDMINSTER TWP 600 1 0 1 0 1
  BERNARDS TWP 5,501 15 10 2 11 38
  BOUND BROOK BORO 1,505 25 3 2 1 31
  BRANCHBURG TWP 1,897 3 4 0 0 7
  BRIDGEWATER-RARITAN REG 9,115 42 21 1 21 85
  FRANKLIN TWP 7,540 19 9 2 4 34
  GREEN BROOK TWP 975 5 2 0 0 7
  HILLSBOROUGH TWP 7,521 32 9 8 13 58
  MANVILLE BORO 1,292 6 1 1 4 12
  MONTGOMERY TWP 5,241 4 15 1 3 23
  NORTH PLAINFIELD BORO 3,082 20 6 6 5 35
  SOMERSET CO ED SERV COMM 162 7 1 2 6 16
  SOMERSET CO VOCATIONAL 454 11 2 3 8 24
  SOMERSET HILLS REGIONAL 2,049 4 2 0 3 9
  SOMERVILLE BORO 2,260 25 2 5 6 38
  SOUTH BOUND BROOK 455 14 1 0 0 15
  WARREN TWP 2,189 1 3 0 0 4
  WATCHUNG BORO 686 0 0 0 0 0
  WATCHUNG HILLS REGIONAL 2,061 60 58 1 6 125
County Total 54,582 294 149 35 91 562
               
SUSSEX            
  ANDOVER REG 710 3 1 0 0 4
  BYRAM TWP 1,160 1 0 1 0 2
  FRANKFORD TWP 687 1 0 0 2 3
  FRANKLIN BORO 487 2 0 1 1 4
  FREDON TWP 346 0 0 0 0 0
  GREEN TWP 525 5 1 1 1 8
  HAMBURG BORO 292 0 0 0 3 3
  HAMPTON TWP 424 0 0 0 0 0
  HARDYSTON TWP 758 3 0 0 0 3
  HIGH POINT REGIONAL 1,298 25 4 0 12 40
  HOPATCONG 2,384 12 4 1 10 26
  KITTATINNY REGIONAL 1,185 5 2 2 2 11
  LAFAYETTE TWP 310 0 0 0 0 0
  LENAPE VALLEY REGIONAL 872 11 8 0 5 24
  MONTAGUE TWP 285 0 0 0 0 0
  NEWTON TOWN 1,605 15 2 0 5 22
  OGDENSBURG BORO 312 7 0 0 0 7
  SANDYSTON-WALPACK TWP 176 0 0 0 0 0
  SPARTA TWP 4,046 13 4 5 13 34
  STANHOPE BORO 396 3 0 0 0 3
  STILLWATER TWP 407 0 0 0 0 0
  SUSSEX CO ED SERV COMM 19 0 0 0 0 0
  Sussex County CS for Tech 100 1 1 0 0 2
  SUSSEX COUNTY VOCATIONAL 603 15 8 2 9 32
  SUSSEX-WANTAGE REGIONAL 1,632 0 0 5 1 6
  VERNON TWP 4,648 38 0 2 12 51
  WALLKILL VALLEY REGIONAL 867 12 1 0 10 23
County Total 26,533 172 36 20 86 308
               
UNION            
  BERKELEY HEIGHTS TWP 2,835 7 17 1 2 27
  Central Jersey Arts CS 254 4 0 0 0 4
  CLARK TWP 2,327 5 14 0 1 20
  CRANFORD TWP 3,712 0 2 1 3 6
  ELIZABETH CITY 21,303 48 28 27 15 112
  GARWOOD BORO 413 6 0 1 0 7
  HILLSIDE TWP 3,161 35 7 6 0 47
  KENILWORTH BORO 1,354 12 1 0 1 14
  LINDEN CITY 6,122 57 16 13 31 115
  MORRIS-UNION JOINTURE COM 336 0 2 0 0 2
  MOUNTAINSIDE BORO 740 14 0 1 0 15
  NEW PROVIDENCE BORO 2,194 7 3 0 7 16
  PLAINFIELD CITY 6,462 147 48 23 0 218
  Queen City Academy CS 241 0 0 0 0 0
  RAHWAY CITY 3,872 9 6 3 2 19
  ROSELLE BORO 2,818 10 2 0 0 12
  ROSELLE PARK BORO 2,013 31 15 5 5 56
  SCOTCH PLAINS-FANWOOD REG 5,333 23 11 3 4 41
  SPRINGFIELD TWP 2,049 10 8 3 1 19
  SUMMIT CITY 3,800 15 8 1 4 28
  UNION CO ED SERV COMM 303 12 0 4 1 17
  Union County TEAMS CS 175 2 0 0 0 2
  UNION COUNTY VOCATIONAL 1,187 5 5 0 2 12
  UNION TWP 7,816 81 17 8 0 104
  WESTFIELD TOWN 6,150 11 3 1 6 21
  WINFIELD TWP 119 0 1 0 0 1
County Total 87,084 551 214 101 85 935
               
WARREN            
  ALLAMUCHY TWP 357 2 2 0 0 4
  ALPHA BORO 266 0 0 0 0 0
  BELVIDERE TOWN 933 15 1 0 1 17
  BLAIRSTOWN TWP 750 1 0 0 0 1
  FRANKLIN TWP 348 0 0 0 0 0
  FRELINGHUYSEN TWP 197 0 0 0 0 0
  GREAT MEADOWS REGIONAL 956 16 8 0 0 23
  GREENWICH TWP 999 1 0 0 0 1
  HACKETTSTOWN 1,885 12 6 0 13 31
  HARMONY TWP 307 4 1 0 0 5
  HOPE TWP 193 1 0 0 0 1
  KNOWLTON TWP 305 2 0 0 0 2
  LOPATCONG TWP 894 8 1 0 0 9
  MANSFIELD TWP 702 0 0 0 0 0
  NORTH WARREN REGIONAL 1,102 37 6 0 13 55
  OXFORD TWP 300 12 0 0 0 12
  PHILLIPSBURG TOWN 3,645 75 21 7 2 104
  POHATCONG TWP 364 1 0 0 1 2
  Ridge and Valley CS 105 3 0 0 0 3
  WARREN CO SPECIAL SERVICE 59 2 0 0 0 2
  WARREN COUNTY VOCATIONAL 446 4 0 0 2 6
  WARREN HILLS REGIONAL 2,039 22 7 1 6 34
  WASHINGTON BORO 494 0 1 2 0 3
  WASHINGTON TWP 647 1 1 0 0 2
  WHITE TWP 420 0 0 0 0 0
County Total 18,713 219 55 10 38 317
State Total 1,378,613 10,998 2,997 1,164 2,763 17,666

Appendix E: Substance and Weapons Detail, 2005-06 - 2007-08

 

2005-06

2006-07

2007-08

Three-Year Change

 

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

Weapons

   

 

         

Handgun

10

0.7%

11

0.8%

9

0.8%

-1

-10%

Rifle

1

0.1%

0

0.0%

0

0.0%

-1

-100%

Air Gun

108

7.4%

74

5.3%

81

6.9%

-27

-25%

Imitation Gun

97

6.6%

90

6.5%

35

3.0%

-62

-64%

Bomb - Exploded

0

0.0%

4

0.3%

0

0.0%

0

0%

Bomb - Unexploded

1

0.1%

3

0.2%

1

0.1%

0

0%

           

 

 

 

Knife

1,052

71.9%

980

70.8%

858

72.9%

-194

-18%

Pin

30

2.1%

36

2.6%

45

3.8%

15

50%

Chain

21

1.4%

27

1.9%

36

3.1%

15

71%

Pepper Spray

21

1.4%

18

1.3%

11

0.9%

-10

-48%

Other

122

8.3%

142

10.3%

101

8.6%

-21

-17%

Total Weapons (duplicated*)

1,463

100.0%

1,385

100.0%

1,177

100.0%

-286

-20%

             

 

 

Substances

           

 

 

Alcohol

537

19.3%

496

17.6%

446

15.6%

-91

-17%

Marijuana

1,794

64.5%

1,809

64.1%

1,886

66.1%

92

5%

Amphetamines

39

1.4%

30

1.1%

28

1.0%

-11

-28%

Party Drug

12

0.4%

8

0.3%

9

0.3%

-3

-25%

Cocaine

122

4.4%

105

3.7%

98

3.4%

-24

-20%

Hallucinogens

18

0.6%

16

0.6%

14

0.5%

-4

-22%

Narcotics

51

1.8%

74

2.6%

50

1.8%

-1

-2%

Depressants

22

0.8%

28

1.0%

40

1.4%

18

82%

Steroids

0

0.0%

5

0.2%

3

0.1%

3

0%

Prescription Drugs

110

4.0%

149

5.3%

195

6.8%

85

77%

Inhalants

4

0.1%

8

0.3%

9

0.3%

5

125%

Drug Paraphernalia

72

2.6%

93

3.3%

74

2.6%

2

3%

Over-the-counter drug

 

 

 

 

41

1.4%

 

 

Total Substances (duplicated*)

2,781

100.0%

2,821

100.0%

2,852

100.0%

71

3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* More than one type of weapon or substance may be associated with an incident.