Supplemental Educational Services Provider Self-Evaluation Survey Results 2004-2005 Project Period

Supplemental Educational Services (SES) providers were surveyed about the services they provided during the 2004-05 project period which began September 1, 2004 and ended August 31, 2005.  Of the 108 agencies approved as providers in 2004-2005 when this survey was disseminated, 97 responded to the SES provider survey.  However, only 62 (57 percent) implemented an SES program during the 2004-05 project period.    The results provide a picture of how SES was implemented to students in New Jersey. 

Program Information

Ninety-seven providers responded to this portion of the survey.  The most challenging issues for the providers during the 2004-05 school year were maintaining the attendance of the students, signing up students for the program and low parent turnout for the provider fairs.  The attendance issues may be related to whether the program is located on the school site or off premises where parents are responsible for delivering and picking up the students.  Other challenges presented for the providers were communicating with or contacting parents, resolving problems with the district including cash-flow concerns, retaining tutors and staff and communicating with district staff, respectively.  It is not clear whether the communication issue with parents was related to getting parents to respond before or after their child was in the program.  However, some variation of communicating with parents was listed several times as a challenge.

Despite the difficulties that the providers encountered, there were only two providers (two percent) that self-reported they received complaints.  These complaints appeared to be issues of communication rather than service or program issues. 

Data for Districts Served

There were 62 providers that responded to this portion of the survey.  These providers served 541 schools in 83 school districts.  16,400 students were enrolled in the program, but only 10,482 or 64 percent were reported as completing the program.  Of the 16,400 students enrolled in the program, 10,600 attended 80 percent or more of the sessions.  Of the total number of students enrolled in the SES services, 1721 or 10 percent were reported to be English Language Learners, 687 or four percent were students with disabilities.

The total number of staff that provided SES services to students during the 2004-05 school year was 2451.  2538 instructional staff received SES training. The additional staff receiving training may reflect providers that trained teachers who did not eventually provide SES.  The duplicated count of staff receiving professional development was 3888 by 59 providers.  Of the 152 topics addressed in these professional development sessions, the primary topics covered in the professional development sessions were (see Attachment 1):  the provider’s program, assessment, behavior management, instructional techniques, curriculum overview, communicating with parents, English language learners, and SES overview.

There were 27 to 30 students per school that participated in the SES program.  The teacher/student ratio ranged from seven to eight students per instructor.  The average number of tutoring sessions for a student was 29 for approximately 84 minutes per session. 

The progress or success of the SES provider was likely to be measured by the state assessments with the exception of the HSPA which was rarely used as a measure.   The respondents indicated that they primarily used, in order of frequency: other measures; provider-developed assessments (see Attachment 2); and the Terra Nova.  The providers determined that of those students that completed the program, 9224 students (88 percent) demonstrated academic progress in reading/language arts literacy, and 7273 students (79 percent) demonstrated academic progress in math based upon the above referenced measures.

Below are the statistics of the survey.

Supplemental Educational Services (SES) providers were surveyed about the services they provided during the 2004-05 project period which began September 1, 2004 and ended August 31, 2005.  Of the 108 agencies approved as providers in 2004-2005 when this survey was disseminated, 97 responded to the SES provider survey.  However, only 62 (57 percent) implemented an SES program during the 2004-05 project period.    The results provide a picture of how SES was implemented to students in New Jersey.  Note that there were providers which may have served students in this project period but who were removed from the list prior to the dissemination of this survey. 

 

Number

Percentage

Statistics on Services Provided

 

 

Number of Providers Implementing SES

62

57%

Number of Providers that did not offer SES

35

32%

Number of Districts Served

83

 

Number of Schools with Students Served

541

 

Number of Students Enrolled

16,400

 

Number of Students Who Completed the Program

10,482

64%

Number of Students Who Did Not Complete the Program

         4,250

26%

Number of Students Who Attended SES Program 80% of Time

10,600

65%

 

 

 

Number of ELL Students Served

1,721

10%

Number of Disabled Students Served

687

4%

 

 

 

Number of Students Receiving LAL Instruction Demonstrating Progress

9,224

88%

Number of Students Receiving Math Demonstrating Progress

7,273

69%

 

 

 

Average Number of Tutoring Sessions per Students

28.6

 

Average Number of Minutes for Tutoring Sessions

84

 

 

 

 

Number of Instructional Staff

2451

 

 

 

 

Measures of Progress (ranked)

 

 

NJASK3

43

 

NJASK4

37

 

GEPA

42

 

HSPA

4

 

Terra Nova

24

 

Other Measurements Used

69

 

 

 

 

Program Implementation

 

 

Summary of Challenges to Providers - Number Responding

97

 

Signing up Students for the Program

31

50%

Low Turnout for Provider Fair

25

40%

Retaining Staff and/or Tutors

9

15%

Student Attendance

40

65%

Resolving Problems with the District

10

16%

Cash Flow Concerns

10

16%

Billing Issues with the District

8

13%

Location of Services for Students

8

13%

Communicating with Parents

15

24%

Communicating with Teachers and/or Administrators

9

15%

 

 

 

Number of Complaints

2

3%

 

 

 

Professional Development

 

 

Number of Providers providing professional development

59

 

Number of Professional Development Topics Addressed

152

 

Number of Instructional Staff Trained

2538

 

Duplicated Count of Instructors Receiving Professional Development

3888

 

*Based upon the number of students who completed the program, 10,482.

Below is the list of assurances and authorization for continued services. Most responses were affirmative or indicated as not applicable if the provider did not provide SES in the 2004-2005 project period.

  1. Services were provided outside of the regular school day.
  1. Services provided were of high quality and based upon research.
  1. Services provided were consistent with the instructional program of the school district and New Jersey's Core Curriculum Content Standards
  1. Fingerprint requirements for employees, per New Jersey statute, have been met.
  1. Provider's employees were paid accurately and in a timely manner.
  1. Provider offered to its staff the professional development activities stipulated in the SES application submitted to the New Jersey Department of Education (NJDOE).
  1. Educational materials were available to tutors and students at all times to maintain instruction.
  1. Services were provided in locations accessible to individuals with disabilities.
  1. No additional admissions criteria were imposed on eligible students.
  1. Federal funds were not used for religious worship or instruction.
  1. Provider complied with the district/charter school's contractual agreements.
  1. Provider is fiscally sound and able to fulfill all agreements to provide services.
  1. Provider has adequate insurance for liability, property loss, and personal injury involving students.
  1. Provider satisfied all other federal, state, and local health, safety, and civil rights requirements.
  1. Provider will provide any requested information made by NJDOE either in writing, verbally, or during a site visit.
  1. Provider complied with the Education Industry Association's Code of Professional Conduct and Business Ethics for Supplemental Educational Services Providers: http://www.educationalindustry.org/Code_of_Standards_and_Ethics_10-29-04.doc
  1. Provider wishes to continue providing quality supplemental educational services as an approved supplemental educational services provider in New Jersey.  In making this agreement, the provider has notified the Office of Title I Program Planning and Accountability of any changes in scope of the supplemental educational services program that differ from their originally approved application.
  1. Provider is aware they be may be removed from the New Jersey Approved SES Provider List if they do not, for two consecutive years, contribute to increased academic proficiency of the students to whom they provide services, and/or do not meet other eligibility requirements or assurances.

Attachment 1

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TOPICS - Summary

Education Station Instructor Training - Reading & Math

ASPIRA Programs and Procedures

Assessment Overview

Behavior Management Strategies

Best instructional practices for meeting student needs

Building a Twenty Minute Guided Reading Block

Classroom Management – Primary & Middle School Educators

Click A Tutor Web Based Instruction

Coaching and mentoring

College Board Resource

Communicating student progress

Continued supervision

Curriculum Guide Orientation Sessions

Developing Metacognitive Skills

Developing Positive Parent Communications

Differentiated Instruction

English Language Learners

ENGLISH GEPA

Financial Literacy

KnowledgePoints Program training

Foundations Curriculum Training

Fox in the Box Training

GEPA Clustering

Harcourt Trophies

Houghton Mifflin Math

How to Help Young Writers Grow - Telephonic Training

Implementing learning paths

Initial Teacher Training

Introduction to SES Program

Kaplan Teacher Development Program

KRE/KME Curriculum and Technology Training

Leapfrog Tracking & Assessment System

Lesson Plans and application

Lightspan

Literacy Strategies for the Atypical Learner

Literacy/ Math/ Learn to Succeed

Materials Training

Math

Math Around the Clock

MATH GEPA

MATH HSPA

Math Manipulatives

Meeting student needs

Monthly review and discussion of Lesson Plans

Monthly Teacher Meetings

NJASK, GEPA

Odyssey Training & Review procedures for program

Orientation on program and materials

Time management in instruction. Transitioning students

Problem Solving Is Everywhere

Program outcomes and needs

Quick Start Career Guide

Reading Comprehension and  Intervention

Review procedures for the program

Scott Foresman Reading Program

SES Overview

SES Self-evaluation workshops (DOE)

Strategies for Instruction

Supporting Struggling Readers

Techniques in Writing

Technology Training

Tutor Protocol & Online Instructional Techniques

Two Voices Read Aloud

Use of CCC Software

Using appropriate intervention in the Language Arts Program

Wilson Language Overview

Working with IEP/504 Students

Writing Across the Curriculum

Writing in Mathematics - Telephonic Training

Attachment 2

OTHER STANDARDIZED ASSESSMENTS

Assessment of Student Achievement (ASA)

Assessments that accompanied curricula

California Achievement Test CAT™

KTEA

Kumon Placement and Kumon Achievement Tests

Kumon Pre Tests and Kumon Post Tests

LeapTrack

LightSpan pre & post testing

Math Level Indicator

Newton Learning Assessment

NJ PASS for 7th graders

NJPASS

Options Predictor

Pathways Curriculum Assessment

Pearson Assessment

PLATO Achieve Now Progress Tests

Plato Learning Edutest

Plato-Edu test

Reading and Math Level Indicators

Reading Level Indicators

Scholastic testing

Supera

teacher made tests

WADE

WOODCOCK