Breast Cancer in New Jersey - 1979-1995
Breast Cancer in New Jersey
Compared to the United States

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WOMEN

A recent report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) ranks New Jersey fifth among the fifty states and the District of Columbia for breast cancer mortality rates among women in 1995.7 Because the CDC report does not include breast cancer mortality rates by race or for men and does not include cancer incidence rates, we used combined 1989 through 1993 data provided by the North American Association of Central Cancer registries, which includes incidence and mortality data by gender and race for New Jersey and the U.S.8,9 These data are presented below and in Tables 6. and 7.

For the combined years 1989 through 1993, the age-adjusted incidence rate for breast cancer among women in New Jersey was higher than the combined U.S. rate; this held true for both white women and black women.8 The age-adjusted mortality rates for all women, white women, and black women were also higher in New Jersey than the U.S.9 For the incidence rate, New Jersey women ranked third (after Connecticut and Western Washington State) among the population-based cancer registries of 14 states and 5 metropolitan areas on which the U.S. rate is based. New Jersey ranked first of the 50 states and 4 metropolitan areas for the mortality rate. White women in New Jersey ranked second for the incidence rate and first for the mortality rate, while black women in New Jersey ranked sixth for the incidence rate and fourth for the mortality rate. Of the three other Northeastern states with comparable- quality incidence data, one, Connecticut, had a higher incidence rate and the two others, Delaware and Rhode Island, had lower incidence rates than New Jersey for all women. (See Table 6. Also, see Appendix IV for a list of the 19 cancer registries on which the combined U.S. rate is based.)

In order to evaluate the comparisons of New Jersey rates with U.S. rates, known demographic characteristics and other risk factors that affect breast cancer rates need to be taken into account. See the Discussion section for more information on recent research about this.

MEN

For the combined years 1989 through 1993, the age-adjusted incidence rate for breast cancer among all men in New Jersey was higher than the combined U.S. rate for all men; this held true for white men but black men in New Jersey had the same rate as black men in the U.S.8 The age-adjusted mortality rates for all men, white men, and black men were higher for New Jersey than for the U.S.9 New Jersey men ranked second of the 19 population-based cancer registries for the incidence rate and fourteenth of the 54 states and metropolitan areas for the mortality rate. White men in New Jersey ranked second for the incidence rate, but eighth for the mortality rate, while black men ranked fifth for the incidence rate and eighth for the mortality rate. (See Table 7. Also, see Appendix IV for a list of the 19 cancer registries on which the combined U.S. rate is based.)

As with comparisons of New Jersey rates with U.S. rates for women, comparisons for men must be interpreted cautiously because demographic characteristics and risk factors that affect the breast cancer rates were not taken into account.

TABLE 6.
FEMALE BREAST CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY
BY RACE, NEW JERSEY AND THE U.S. - 1989-1993
1


WHITEBLACKALL RACES

N. J. U.S. N.J. U.S. N.J. U.S.
Incidence 26,251 236,546 2,502 18,470 29,511 268,526
Incidence Rate2 117.1 109.9 94.0 93.1 114.9107.3
Incidence Rank3 2 - 6 -3 -
Mortality 7,426190,359 903 23,644 8,378216,424
Mortality Rate2 31.126.6 34.4 31.3 31.126.8
Mortality Rank4 1 - 4 -15 -

1From Cancer in North America, 1989-1993 Volume One: Incidence, eds. Howe HL, Lehnherr M, North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and Cancer in North America, 1989-1993 Volume Two: Mortality, eds. Howe HL, Lehnherr M, North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Includes invasive breast cancer cases; does not include in situ breast cancer cases.
2Per 100,000 women, age-adjusted to the U.S. 1970 population.
3The incidence ranks are based on the incidence rates from 19 population-based registries in the U.S. and are highest (1) to lowest (19).
4The mortality ranks are based on the mortality rates from 54 states and metropolitan areas in the U.S. and are highest (1) to lowest (54).
5A CDC report ranks New Jersey fifth for breast cancer mortality rates among women in 1995.

TABLE 7
MALE BREAST CANCER INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY
BY RACE, NEW JERSEY AND THE U.S. - 1989-1993
1


WHITEBLACKALL RACES

N. J. U.S. N.J. U.S. N.J. U.S.
Incidence 224 1,598 19 160 2531,861
Incidence Rate2 1.20.9 1.1 1.1 1.30.9
Incidence Rank3 2 - 5 -2 -
Mortality 581,273 9 204 671,491
Mortality Rate2 0.30.2 0.6 0.4 0.30.2
Mortality Rank4 8 - 8 -14 -

1From Cancer in North America, 1989-1993 Volume One: Incidence, eds. Howe HL, Lehnherr M, North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and Cancer in North America, 1989-1993 Volume Two: Mortality, eds. Howe HL, Lehnherr M, North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Includes invasive breast cancer cases; does not include in situ breast cancer cases.
2Per 100,000 men, age-adjusted to the U.S. 1970 population.
3The incidence rank is based on the incidence rates from 19 population registries in the U.S. and are highest (1) to lowest (19).
4The mortality ranks are based on the mortality rates from 54 states and metropolitan areas in the U.S. and are highest (1) to lowest (54).


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