Cancer Among Hispanics In New Jersey

Trends In Cancer Incidence And Mortality, 1990-1996

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In viewing the trends in this report, it should be noted that annual rates in relatively small populations tend to vary markedly from year to year. Annual rates in minority populations are, therefore, less stable than in larger populations, and genuine trends may not be easy to distinguish from year to year fluctuations.

Cancer Incidence Trends-Males

Figure 1 shows the statewide trends in the total cancer incidence rate for males by race and ethnicity. While no clear trend is evident in the total cancer incidence rates for Hispanic males, annual incidence rates among Hispanic males were consistently lower than for non-Hispanic whites and blacks. The rate among Hispanic males was nearly the same in 1990 as in 1996, highest in 1991, and lowest in 1993. In contrast, among non-Hispanic white males, the total cancer incidence rate was highest in 1992, but was higher in 1996 than in 1990. The total cancer incidence rate for black males was highest in 1993 and, like non-Hispanic white males, was higher in 1996 than in 1990.

Cancer Incidence Trends-Females

Figure 2 shows the statewide trends in total cancer incidence rates for females by race and ethnicity. For Hispanic women, the total cancer incidence rate was almost the same in 1990 as in 1996, but was consistently lower compared with non-Hispanic white and black women. Among non-Hispanic white females, the total cancer incidence rate increased by about four percent during the period 1990-1996. Total cancer incidence rates among black women changed little between 1990 and 1996.

Cancer Mortality Trends-Males

Figure 3 shows the statewide trends in total cancer mortality rates for males by race and ethnicity. As with the incidence rates for males, Hispanics had the lowest mortality rates and blacks had the highest mortality rates. Total mortality rates among all three groups were slightly lower in 1996 compared with 1990. For Hispanic males only, the year with the lowest overall cancer mortality rate was 1995.

Cancer Mortality Trends-Females

Figure 4 shows the statewide trends in total cancer mortality rates for females by race and ethnicity. The total cancer mortality rate among Hispanic females was consistently lower than the corresponding non-Hispanic white and black rate, and it varied little between 1990 and 1996. Total cancer mortality was slightly lower in 1996 than in 1990, but the highest rate occurred in 1991 and the lowest rate in 1993. The total cancer mortality rates were slightly higher among black than non-Hispanic white females.


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