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Impact Assessment

The New Jersey State Planning Commission is now in the process of updating New Jersey’s State Development and Redevelopment Plan. The New Jersey State Planning Act (N.J.S.A. 52:18A-196 et. seq.) requires that an Impact Assessment Study of a Draft Final State Plan be performed and the results of the study made available before adoption of a Final State Plan. The purpose of the Impact Assessment is to identify desirable changes, if any, to be incorporated into the State Plan prior to its adoption or re-adoption. The Impact Assessment is to describe the impacts of fully implementing the policies and strategies proposed in the 2005 Draft Final State Plan (“Plan scenario”) relative to the impacts that would most likely occur with the continuation of current (2004) trends in the absence of the 2005 Draft Final State Plan (“Trend scenario”).

Pursuant to the State Planning Act, the State Planning Commission is also required to [..] “Prepare and adopt as part of the State Plan a long-term Infrastructure Needs Assessment, which shall provide information on present and prospective conditions, needs and costs with regard to State, county and municipal capital facilities, including water, sewerage, transportation, solid waste, drainage, flood protection, shore protection and related capital facilities” (N.J.S.A. 52:18A-199.b).

Both the 2001 Impact Assessment Study and the  2001 Infrastructure Needs Assessment [pdf 8.6M] are available.

Download the 2000 Impact Assessment

Executive Summary [pdf 780k]
The Costs and Benefits of Alternative Growth Patterns: The Impact Assessment of the New Jersey State Plan (entire document) ZIP file [zip 20.3M] of PDF files.



Prepared by

Robert W. Burchell, Ph.D., William R. Dolphin, Catherine C. Galley
Center for Urban Policy Research, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
With the assistance of
Richard K. Brail, Ph.D., Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Alex Zakrewski, Center for Urban Policy Research, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey; Nancy C. Neuman, Ph.D., Sandstone Environmental Associates
Reviewed by
John Epling, D.P.A., The Epling Corporation; Charles L. Siemon, Esq., Siemon Larsen and Marsh; David Slater, Hammer Siler George Associates; James C. Nicholas, Ph.D., Univeristy of Florida; Neil Muller, Muller Bohlin Associates

Download the 1992 Impact Assessment
Executive Summary [pdf 2.1M]
Report I: Research Strategy
Report II: Research Findings
Cover, Introduction, Summary [pdf 1.4M]
Economic Assessment [pdf 5.6M]
Environmental Assessment [pdf 8.8M]
Infrastructure Assessment [pdf 12.5M]
Community Life Assessment [pdf 6.9M]
Intergovernmental Coordination Assessment [pdf 2.3M]
Selected References [pdf 315k]
Report III: Supplemental Amended Interim Plan Assessment
Cover, Introduction, Summary [pdf 718k]
Supplemental Economic Assessment [pdf 798k]
Supplemental Environmental Assessment [pdf 1.1M]
Supplemental Infrastructure Assessment [pdf 1.1M]
Supplemental Community Life and Intergovernmental Coordination Assessments [pdf 721k]

Many participants in the initial State Planning process were supportive of the goals of the State Planning Act, but worried that the costs may be too great to absorb. The New Jersey Legislature responded to these concerns by amending the Act in 1989 to provide for an assessment of the Plan's impacts. Because the Plan would be designed to achieve a number of conflicting goals, the Legislature acted to include impacts on the State's fiscal, economic, environmental, housing, infrastructure, intergovernmental coordination and quality of life feature in the study. In 1990, the Center for Urban Policy Research at Rutgers University assembled a team of academic and private sector experts in these areas and, after exhaustive research and computer modeling, their findings, published in 1992, supported the Plan's policy recommendations.

The researchers found that compared to a continuation of current development patterns, by the year 2010, implementation of the State Plan could save $700 million in road costs, $562 million in water supply and sewer infrastructure costs, $178 million in school capital facilities, and up to $380 million per year in operating costs to local governments and school districts during this planning period.

By the year 2010, when compared to a continuation of current development patterns, implementation of the State Plan can also result in significant improvements to natural resources and the environment by protecting an additional 30,000 acres of environmentally fragile lands, preserving 40,000 additional acres of farmland, and reducing water pollutants by 40%.

Copies of the study are available directly from the Center for Urban Policy Research at Rutgers University.