Skip to main content

Information on
Novel Coronavirus

Have general questions about COVID-19?
The NJ Poison Control Center and 211 have partnered with the State to provide information to the public on COVID-19:
Call: 2-1-1
Call (24/7): 1-800-962-1253
Text: NJCOVID to 898-211
Visit https://covid19.nj.gov/ or nj.gov/health for additional information

Department of State

NJ Motion Picture & Television Commission

The Hon. Tahesha Way, Secretary

NJ Motion Picture & Television Commission Update

The physical office of the New Jersey Motion Picture and Television Commission may be closed due to a wider closure of State of New Jersey government offices, but WE WILL REMAIN OPERATIVE via phone and e-mail. During this uncertain time, please reach out to us via our e-mail address (njfilm@sos.nj.gov) and staff members will respond either by e-mail or phone, as required. If your business or livelihood is being impacted by the COVID-19/Novel Coronavirus outbreak, please visit the following web site: cv.business.nj.gov

Regulations

New Jersey contains 21 counties and 566 municipalities. Each city and town has its own unique regulations pertaining to film production. New Jersey Motion Picture and Television Commission staff members are well versed in these matters, and should be consulted before specific communities are approached.

As a rule, filmmakers working in New Jersey are required to carry general liability insurance in the amount of $1 million ($2 million in the City of Newark). Additional insurance may be required of crews using pyrotechnic effects or performing stunts. Typically, production companies are asked to present certificates of insurance naming property owners as "additional insured." Further, property owners must be relieved of all liability in connection with production work taking place on their respective locations.

Many cities and towns in the state have no formal permit procedure. However, permits are generally required for filming such locations as county, state and national parks and historic sites, state and county highways, railroad and airport terminals and military posts.

Child Labor

New Jersey Law requires that any company or individual producing a theatrical production which includes stage, motion picture and television performances and rehearsals with minors under age 18 years of age in New Jersey (even if said minors are unpaid) MUST obtain New Jersey Child Labor Permits. New Jersey Child Labor Permits are cost free, uncomplicated to obtain and can be procured quickly. Child labor permits or working papers from other states are NOT validin New Jersey and cannot substitute for New Jersey Child Labor Permits. If you are new to this process, we strongly advise that you contact The New Jersey Motion Picture Commission at 973-648-6279 and speak with a staff member before you begin to fill out any paperwork.

There are two types of permits:

  1. Emergent Permit – for film or theatrical productions utilizing minors for 1-2 days total. Please note, you may use this permit if you are filming with minors for more than 2 shoot days, as long as no individual minor works more than 2 of those production days. The New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development requires two (2) working days advance notification (not includingholidays or weekends)prior to filming, or the performance of a theatrical production, in order to guarantee that requisite child labor permitswill be issued. For assistance with these permits contact the New Jersey Motion Picture & TV Commission at 973-648-6279.
  2. Formal Permit – for productions utilizing the services of a given minor or minors for 3 or more days (up to 3 months). For assistance with these permits contact the NJ Department of Labor at 609-292-7880.

Below you will find links to necessary forms and specific instructions for obtaining permits. The Motion Picture and Television Commission will gladly answer any questions and, when necessary, refer you to officials at the Department of Labor and Workforce Development. We are committed to ensuring the safety of minors working in New Jersey’s film and television industry, and dedicated to the success of your project.

Some Quick Facts:

Maximum Hours per day/week: Minors between the ages of 16 and 18 can work as long as 8 hours daily, 40 hours weekly, 6 days a week. Minors under 16 are permitted to be on set for a maximum of 8 hours daily and before the camera for a maximum of 5 of those hours, 24 hours weekly, 6 days a week. Combined hours of school and work must not exceed 8 hours daily. The minor’s travel time to and from set is not factored into their on-set time or work time. In the case of theatrical productions, where the performances are separable into discrete shows, the proposed employment of minor will not exceed two shows in a day or a total of eight shows in any given week.

When can a minor work? Unless a special waiver is granted by the Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development, minors under 16 are prohibited from working before 7 a.m. or after 11:30 p.m. while minors between the ages of 16 and 18 are prohibited from working before 6 a.m. or after 11:30 p.m. The Commissioner of Labor and Workforce Development does not have the authority to alter or amend the total hours in the day during which a minor may work. Contact the Motion Picture and Television Commission for more information about obtaining a waiver of hours when night filming is required.

Minors under 16 must be accompanied at all times by an adult who is a parent, guardian or representative of the employer. There is no minimum age requirement for children working in motion pictures and television programs. A current statement based upon a physical examination issued by a licensed physician, that certifies that the minor is in good health and will not likely be endangered by the working conditions of the prospective employment, must be provided. For minors under 8 years of age, the physical examination must include a visual acuity screening if practicable. The use of infants and toddlers, however, should be further governed by an abundance of caution, common sense and good judgment.

Child Labor Law
NJ Child Labor Law abstract
Child Labor Law
Directions for obtaining Child Labor Permits
Obtaining Formal Theatrical Permits For Minors
Obtaining Emergent Theatrical Permits For Minors
Forms
A310 (For use with Formal Theatrical Permit only; minors under 16)
A300 (For use with Formal Theatrical Permit only; minors 16 and over)
NJ Theatrical Production Application

 

 

 


Back
to top