New Jersey Department of Education

COVID-19 Information

COVID-19 is still active.   Wear a mask.  Social distance.  Stay up to date on vaccine information.
COVID19 Alert NJDownload free COVID Alert app.
Visit covid19.nj.gov/app

FAQs

High School Equivalency Tests Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What are the high school equivalency tests?

A: There are three high school equivalency tests approved by the United States Department of Education and the New Jersey State Board of Education. They are the GED, HiSET and TASC. All three are aligned to federal Career and College Readiness Standards and designed to measure skills and concepts associated with four years of regular high school instruction. Each test is developed by adult and secondary educators and subject matter specialists. Each of the tests corresponds to the general framework of most high school curricula: writing skills, social studies, science, interpreting literature and the arts, and mathematics.

Q: How is this series of high school equivalency tests different than the GED series of tests prior to 2014?

A: The GED, HiSET, and TASC assessments are aligned to the federal Career and College Readiness Standards and designed to measure skills and concepts associated with four years of regular high school instruction. Each test is developed by adult and secondary educators and subject matter specialists. Each of the tests corresponds to the general framework of most high school curricula: writing skills, social studies, science, interpreting literature and the arts, and mathematics. All GED tests prior to 2014 were norm-referenced tests aligned to a 60/40 pass/fail ratio of juniors on path to graduate. The new tests are more difficult, and the department recommend some type of preparation. Please contact your local county One-Stop Career Center.

Q: Who is eligible for the tests?

A: The tests are intended primarily for persons who, for any number of reasons, have missed their first opportunity to complete a high school program of instruction. The tests can be administered only to persons who are at least 16 years old; have not graduated from an accredited high school or received a high school equivalency certificate or diploma; and are not currently enrolled in a traditional high school. You must be a New Jersey resident. If you are 16 or 17 years old, you must complete a Certificate of Consent to Participate, verifying that you are not enrolled in school, and the parent or legal guardian must bring it in person to the test center or have the consent form notarized by a New Jersey notary before a test will be administered. If you have a legal guardian, you must bring a copy of the court document awarding guardianship to the test center before a test will be administered. Written confirmation of eligibility must be provided by all candidates. You must bring identification to your test center when registering for a test. The identification requirements are found on the Test Centers webpage.

Q: How do I sign up for the high school equivalency tests?

A: Tests may be taken only at testing centers that have been approved by the New Jersey Department of Education. Special accommodations are available for qualified persons. You must contact the testing center where you wish to take the test to find out the testing schedule and how to register for the test.

Q: What is the cost of each assessment?

A: The following lists the general cost of each assessment. Contact the testing center about any additional fees.

Vendor (Test)

Cost
(Non-Refundable)

Fee for each subtest

GED (GED)

$120.00

 

$10 per subtest paid to test center

After second retest, $30/each

GED (Online Proctoring)

$120.00

$30 for each subtest

ETS (HiSET)

$103.75

$10 per subtest paid to test center

After second retest, $20.75 each

ETS (HiSET@home)

$141.25

$28.25 for each subtest

DRC (TASC)

$104.00

$10 per subtest paid to test center

After second retest, $22.80 each

 

Q: Where can I find information on what subjects are covered in each of the approved high school equivalency tests?

A: Each test vendor has information on their webpage about their current assessment: GED, HiSET and TASC. Information on the pre-2014 GED can also be found on the GED webpage.

Q: Are the assessments offered on paper and computer?

A: All tests are now offered on the computer. A paper test will only be offered if you apply for and receive a special accommodation from the test vendor.

Q: Can the high school equivalency tests be taken at home?

A: The GED allows online testing for students who pass the practice test with a score of 145 or better and meet their technical computer requirements.

The HiSET does not require passing the practice test, and if their technical requirements are meet, the student can exam at home.

The TASC is not yet offering an at-home testing option.

Q: What are the passing scores for the high school equivalency tests?

A: In order to qualify for a New Jersey state-endorsed high school diploma, candidates must meet the minimum test score requirements. The New Jersey Department of Education Adult Education web page lists the passing scores for GED, HiSET and TASC

Q: What do I do if I fail all or a sub-section of the assessment?

A: Contact the test center of your choice to reschedule the test and for any information on additional costs.

Q: Can I combine passing subtest scores from the GED, HiSET and TASC to earn a diploma?

A: Yes, but the diploma is not automatically issued the same way as when one passes a complete test vendor series. The New Jersey Department of Education’s Adult Education Office must be contacted by the student or test center, with each test vendor id number, the student name, date of birth, social security number or taxpayer identification, and current mailing address. However, GED test scores prior to 2014 cannot be combined with current GED, HiSET or TASC scores.

Q: How do I request special accommodations for testing?

A: If you are a qualified candidate with a Specific Learning Disability (SLD), a physical disability, or a psychological disability, you can ask for a special edition of the tests, or modifications to the test administration that will assist you. The passing score requirements are the same for all candidates. A special accommodation approved by one test vendor may only be valid for that test and further verification of the disability may be needed by another vendor if you chose to take their test. Please visit How to Request Special Accommodations on the Adult Education webpage.

Q: How do I obtain my diploma and transcript after passing the test?

A: It takes about three to four weeks for the test vendor (GED, HiSET, TASC) to transmit scores to the New Jersey Department of Education’s database. Test scores are received from the vendors every Wednesday. Diplomas and transcripts are printed the following day (Thursday) and are then mailed immediately.

However, during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic, test scores are received from the test vendors every Wednesday, diplomas and transcripts are printed the following day (Thursday) and are then mailed on Monday.

Q: How do I obtain a copy of my transcript?

A: Per the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), the federal privacy law, a signed request from the student is required to release any education/testing information. Please enter your access or verification code to access your official transcript.

Q: How can I check to see when my test scores have been received by the NJ DOE?

A: After you take one of the tests, you can use your GED, HiSET or TASC ID number and your last name on our test history webpage to see when your scores are received form the vendor.

When all scores received are passing, a diploma date will appear. If you have a question whether or not we received all scores, you can use the same code and your last name on the test history option. If your test scores do not appear, please email the New Jersey Department of Education’s Adult Education Office (adulted@doe.nj.gov) as soon as possible. We will contact the appropriate vendor or research for any database issue that needs to be resolved. Once you see your diploma date, you can print the official transcript and diploma verification for school and employment.

Q: How can an employer or school verify I have earned my state-issued High School Diploma?

A: Technology allows the NJ DOE to use access and verification codes. All individuals who have earned a state-issued high school diploma have an access code, and since May 2007 that code has been on the diploma and transcript. Either code can be used, but not both at the same time, and are entered into the appropriate field, on the Diploma Verification Process webpage. That page has a link to accessing the transcript, and a separate link to access diploma verification. Both documents indicate passing and that a diploma was earned. The transcript is usually used for school or training, and the diploma verification for employment. Please note that the New Jersey Department of Education does not mail any document with a raised seal. Please direct anyone with questions about this policy to this document.

Q: Some test takers have passed one or more of the subjects on the former 2002 series GED test. Will those scores be honored after January 1, 2014?

A: No. Once a test series ends, a student who has not passed all portions of the test and achieved the total score of 2250 will have to take a new assessment.

Q: I provide adult education services and help prepare students for the high school equivalency tests. How should I adjust my services in order to prepare students for the current assessments?

A: All the current assessments are aligned with the New Jersey Student Learning Standards. Teachers should prepare and teach towards these rigorous standards. Preparation materials and professional development are offered by the test vendors.

Q: Who can become a New Jersey state-approved test center, and how?

A: All New Jersey high schools, community and four-year colleges, state agencies, and nonprofit companies are currently permitted to be test centers. Public schools, libraries and government agencies can contact the New Jersey Department of Education, Office of Adult Education, if they wish to become a test center. A Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) will need to be completed.

The New Jersey Department of Education allows for-profit and nonprofit companies, apprenticeship programs, and others to become test centers, as well. This is done by a Request for Qualifications for New Jersey Adult Education Test Centers for High School Equivalency Assessment. Test centers contract with any of the three NJDOE-approved test vendors. Offering multiple assessments is encouraged.

Q: Are the assessments offered on paper and computer?

A: All tests are now offered on the computer. A paper test will only be offered if you apply for and receive a special accommodation from the test vendor.

Q: If I took an assessment (2014 GED series, HiSET or TASC) in another state will those scores count and be transferred to New Jersey?

A: Those who took the GED prior to January 1, 2014, and did not pass all sections, or passed all sections but did not have the total score needed and didn’t receive a state credential, are not able to have the scores transferred to New Jersey as they have expired.

The current GED, HiSET and TASC taken in another state that did not result in the awarding of a credential from that state can be transferred to New Jersey. The test taker must notify the test center and/or test vendor so that the scores can be transferred to New Jersey.

Q: Where can I find Information on what level of mathematics was covered on the pre-2014 GED test?

A: The level of math skills possessed by GED graduates has come under review in the pursuit of educational enhancement as well as in seeking employment opportunities. Apprenticeship programs for certain unionized trades also have specific requirements for appropriate math skills. The math skills most often questioned are those surrounding Algebra, specifically whether or not the level of Algebra contained in the pre-2014 GED test is equivalent to an Algebra One class at the high school level. Upon consulting with the GED Testing Service in Washington, D.C., the following explanation can be offered regarding the level of Algebra covered in the GED Math test.

Approximately 25% of the test questions cover the major Algebra concepts. Most of these concepts would be encountered in a typical Algebra One course, but some, particularly the more difficult equation types, may only be studied in later Algebra courses. A quote from a math teacher with over thirty years’ experience as well as being a Mathematics Test Specialist with the GED Testing Service sums it up best:"...the breadth of mathematics tested on the GED Mathematics Test far exceeds that encompassed by a typical Algebra One course of study alone." In addition to the content areas covered. They are divided into three cognitive levels – Application, Modeling and Problem Solving.

 


Back
to top