Mosquito and Tick-Borne Weekly Disease Reports

The Department conducts routine testing of mosquito pools and other sources of vector-borne illness. The results are published weekly during the annual peak period for vector-borne illnesses.

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Fight the Bite, NJ!

When infected blood-sucking insects (such as mosquitoes and ticks) bite a person, they can spread vector-borne illnesses such as West Nile Virus and Lyme disease. There are many types of vector-borne illness. The best defense against them is to take steps to avoid being bitten by infected insects.

The Communicable Disease Service has staff dedicated to the monitoring, control and prevention of vector-borne diseases.

Specific activities performed by vector-borne illness staff include:

  • Surveillance of vector-borne diseases
  • Identifying risk factors
  • Monitoring geographic trends
  • Providing technical assistance and training
  • Educating the public

Vector-borne diseases in New Jersey include:

Some vector-borne diseases that do not occur in New Jersey but may be identified in travelers returning from other states or countries where these diseases may occur:

Laboratory Testing and Guidance

There are several emerging/reemerging or very rare arboviral diseases that are transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks that may impact NJ residents. Commercial testing may not be widely available, but specialized testing at public health laboratories can be provided for these diseases. Clinicians who would like to request arboviral disease testing should complete the Arboviral Testing Request worksheet and send via encrypted email to CDSVectorTeam@doh.nj.gov. Arboviral testing can be requested for patients who are hospitalized with neuroinvasive disease (e.g., encephalitis, meningitis, acute flaccid paralysis) of unknown etiology or, for patients presenting with a febrile illness of unknown etiology if an arboviral disease is suspected.

To request Zika virus testing, please click here.

To request Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiosis testing, please click here.

Routine bird testing for WNV has been discontinued, but it is still recommended to report dead or ill birds to the county mosquito control agency; testing birds for WNV remains available by special request.

Last Reviewed: 8/19/2019