Phillip Alampi Beneficial Insect Rearing Laboratory

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Phillip Alampi Beneficial Insect Rearing Laboratory

 Spotted Lantern Fly : Photo

If you see a Spotted Lanternfly, help us Stomp it Out!

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 Some of the beneficial insects reared at PABIL.

Some of the beneficial insects reared at PABIL.

 Columbia Lake before and after the release of the beneficial Galerucella spp. beetle.

Columbia Lake before and after the release of the beneficial Galerucella spp. beetle.

 Parasitoid rearing Containers.

Parasitoid rearing Containers.

NJ Beneficial Insect Laboratory Data
100+
Thousand Acres of Soybeans Protected From Mexican Bean Beetle
1985
The Year the Lab was built
$450
Thousand Dollars Saved by Growers Annually
1.5
Million Galerucella spp. beetles have been released to control Purple Loosestrife
$290
Million dollars annually from direct crop loss or damage caused by agricultural pests

Under the Microscope: What's Happening In The Bug Lab

Bean Beetle Project and Farmer Success

2021 was the first year of our Mexican Bean Beetle Outreach Project for NJ. We are looking forward to expanding our in-state reach with this program in 2022.

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Mile-A-Minute Weevils For Sale

PABIL wants to help New Jersey residents get involved with the Mile-a-minute biocontrol and stop the spread of this invasive weed.

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In the News

See PABIL featured on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

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Our Mission

The Phillip Alampi Beneficial Insect Rearing Laboratory exists:

  • To reduce plant pest damage in forest and agricultural crops
  • To protect natural and renewable resources and other open lands through the rearing and release of beneficial insects, thereby reducing pesticide applications, insect resistance to pesticides, and reducing the amount of excess chemicals in the environment
  • To conserve natural enemies of pests and to conserve and protect our natural resources
  • To develop and improve insect mass rearing techniques for biological control programs to be implemented and expanded
  • To develop and test new biological control technologies

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